Wide
Wide Wide (w[imac]d), a. [Compar. {Wider} (-[~e]r); superl. {Widest}.] [OE. wid, wyde, AS. w[=i]d; akin to OFries. & OS. w[=i]d, D. wijd, G. weit, OHG. w[=i]t, Icel. v[=i][eth]r, Sw. & Dan. vid; of uncertain origin.] 1. Having considerable distance or extent between the sides; spacious across; much extended in a direction at right angles to that of length; not narrow; broad; as, wide cloth; a wide table; a wide highway; a wide bed; a wide hall or entry. [1913 Webster]

The chambers and the stables weren wyde. --Chaucer. [1913 Webster]

Wide is the gate . . . that leadeth to destruction. --Matt. vii. 18. [1913 Webster]

2. Having a great extent every way; extended; spacious; broad; vast; extensive; as, a wide plain; the wide ocean; a wide difference. ``This wyde world.'' --Chaucer. [1913 Webster]

For sceptered cynics earth were far too wide a den. --Byron. [1913 Webster]

When the wide bloom, on earth that lies, Seems of a brighter world than ours. --Bryant. [1913 Webster]

3. Of large scope; comprehensive; liberal; broad; as, wide views; a wide understanding. [1913 Webster]

Men of strongest head and widest culture. --M. Arnold. [1913 Webster]

4. Of a certain measure between the sides; measuring in a direction at right angles to that of length; as, a table three feet wide. [1913 Webster]

5. Remote; distant; far. [1913 Webster]

The contrary being so wide from the truth of Scripture and the attributes of God. --Hammond. [1913 Webster]

6. Far from truth, from propriety, from necessity, or the like. ``Our wide expositors.'' --Milton. [1913 Webster]

It is far wide that the people have such judgments. --Latimer. [1913 Webster]

How wide is all this long pretense ! --Herbert. [1913 Webster]

7. On one side or the other of the mark; too far side-wise from the mark, the wicket, the batsman, etc. [1913 Webster]

Surely he shoots wide on the bow hand. --Spenser. [1913 Webster]

I was but two bows wide. --Massinger. [1913 Webster]

8. (Phon.) Made, as a vowel, with a less tense, and more open and relaxed, condition of the mouth organs; -- opposed to primary as used by Mr. Bell, and to narrow as used by Mr. Sweet. The effect, as explained by Mr. Bell, is due to the relaxation or tension of the pharynx; as explained by Mr. Sweet and others, it is due to the action of the tongue. The wide of [=e] ([=e]ve) is [i^] ([i^]ll); of [=a] ([=a]te) is [e^] ([e^]nd), etc. See Guide to Pronunciation, [sect] 13-15. [1913 Webster]

9. (Stock Exchanges) Having or showing a wide difference between the highest and lowest price, amount of supply, etc.; as, a wide opening; wide prices, where the prices bid and asked differ by several points. [Webster 1913 Suppl.]

Note: Wide is often prefixed to words, esp. to participles and participial adjectives, to form self-explaining compounds; as, wide-beaming, wide-branched, wide-chopped, wide-echoing, wide-extended, wide-mouthed, wide-spread, wide-spreading, and the like. [1913 Webster]

{Far and wide}. See under {Far}.

{Wide gauge}. See the Note under {Cauge}, 6. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • wide — [wīd] adj. wider, widest [ME < OE wid, akin to Ger weit < IE * wi itos, lit., gone apart (< bases * wi , apart + * ei , to go) > L vitare, lit., to go away from, avoid] 1. extending over a large area; esp., extending over a larger… …   English World dictionary

  • wide — ► ADJECTIVE (wider, widest) 1) of great or more than average width. 2) (after a measurement and in questions) from side to side. 3) open to the full extent. 4) including a great variety of people or things. 5) spread among a large number or over… …   English terms dictionary

  • Wide — Wide, n. 1. That which is wide; wide space; width; extent. The waste wide of that abyss. Tennyson. [1913 Webster] 2. That which goes wide, or to one side of the mark. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • wide — rather than widely is used in a number of fixed expressions such as wide apart, wide awake, and wide open, as an element in the word widespread, and in the phrases hit (or shoot) wide and open one s eyes wide …   Modern English usage

  • WIDE — bezeichnet das: WIDE Projekt WIDE Netzwerk Women in Development Europe ist ein Zusammenschluss entwicklungspolitischer NROs in Österreich Wide ist der Familienname von: Edvin Wide (1896–1996), schwedischer Leichtathlet …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • WIDE — may refer to:*WIDE LP, a radio station (99.1 FM) licensed to Madison, Wisconsin, United States *Wide angle Infinity Display Equipment *WIDE Project (Widely Integrated Distributed Environment) *Women in Development Europe …   Wikipedia

  • Wide — Wide, adv. [As. w[imac]de.] 1. To a distance; far; widely; to a great distance or extent; as, his fame was spread wide. [1913 Webster] [I] went wyde in this world, wonders to hear. Piers Plowman. [1913 Webster] 2. So as to leave or have a great… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • wide — O.E. wid, from P.Gmc. *widas (Cf. O.S., O.Fris. wid, O.N. viðr, Du. wijd, O.H.G. wit, Ger. weit), perhaps from PIE *wi ito , from root *wi apart, away. Wide open unguarded, exposed to attack (1915) originally was in boxing, etc. Wide awake ( …   Etymology dictionary

  • wide — [adj1] expansive, roomy advanced, allinclusive, ample, baggy, broad, capacious, catholic, commodious, comprehensive, deep, dilated, distended, encyclopedic, expanded, extensive, far ranging, far reaching, full, general, immense, inclusive, large …   New thesaurus

  • wide — index broad, capacious, comprehensive, copious, extensive, far reaching, generic, inclusive, liberal (not liter …   Law dictionary

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