Whim shaft
Whim Whim, n. [Cf. Icel. hwima to wander with the eyes, vim giddiness, Norw. kvima to whisk or flutter about, to trifle, Dan. vimse to skip, whisk, jump from one thing to another, dial. Sw. hvimsa to be unsteady, dizzy, W. chwimio to move briskly.] [1913 Webster] 1. A sudden turn or start of the mind; a temporary eccentricity; a freak; a fancy; a capricious notion; a humor; a caprice. [1913 Webster]

Let every man enjoy his whim. --Churchill. [1913 Webster]

2. (Mining) A large capstan or vertical drum turned by horse power or steam power, for raising ore or water, etc., from mines, or for other purposes; -- called also {whim gin}, and {whimsey}. [1913 Webster]

{Whim gin} (Mining), a whim. See {Whim}, 2.

{Whim shaft} (Mining), a shaft through which ore, water, etc., is raised from a mine by means of a whim. [1913 Webster]

Syn: Freak; caprice; whimsey; fancy.

Usage: {Whim}, {Freak}, {Caprice}. Freak denotes an impulsive, inconsiderate change of mind, as by a child or a lunatic. Whim is a mental eccentricity due to peculiar processes or habits of thought. Caprice is closely allied in meaning to freak, but implies more definitely a quality of willfulness or wantonness. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Whim — Whim, n. [Cf. Icel. hwima to wander with the eyes, vim giddiness, Norw. kvima to whisk or flutter about, to trifle, Dan. vimse to skip, whisk, jump from one thing to another, dial. Sw. hvimsa to be unsteady, dizzy, W. chwimio to move briskly.]… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Whim gin — Whim Whim, n. [Cf. Icel. hwima to wander with the eyes, vim giddiness, Norw. kvima to whisk or flutter about, to trifle, Dan. vimse to skip, whisk, jump from one thing to another, dial. Sw. hvimsa to be unsteady, dizzy, W. chwimio to move briskly …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • whim gin — Whim Whim, n. [Cf. Icel. hwima to wander with the eyes, vim giddiness, Norw. kvima to whisk or flutter about, to trifle, Dan. vimse to skip, whisk, jump from one thing to another, dial. Sw. hvimsa to be unsteady, dizzy, W. chwimio to move briskly …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Crank shaft — Crank Crank (kr[a^][ng]k), n. [OE. cranke; akin to E. cringe, cringle, crinkle, and to crank, a., the root meaning, probably, to turn, twist. See {Cringe}.] 1. (Mach.) A bent portion of an axle, or shaft, or an arm keyed at right angles to the… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • whimsey — Whim Whim, n. [Cf. Icel. hwima to wander with the eyes, vim giddiness, Norw. kvima to whisk or flutter about, to trifle, Dan. vimse to skip, whisk, jump from one thing to another, dial. Sw. hvimsa to be unsteady, dizzy, W. chwimio to move briskly …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Poldark Mine — was a tin mine in Cornwall worked sometime between 1720 and 1780. The mine was originally called Wheal Roots and little is known of its early workings. In 1856 it became part of the Wendron Consols Mine and is shown on the surface plan of that… …   Wikipedia

  • Mining in the Upper Harz — The headframe of the Emperor William Shaft in Clausthal is one of the oldest surviving winding towers in Germany …   Wikipedia

  • Negima!? — Negima? redirects here. For the original series Negima!? is based on, see Negima! Magister Negi Magi. Negima!? Promotional advertisement ネギま!? …   Wikipedia

  • Crank — (kr[a^][ng]k), n. [OE. cranke; akin to E. cringe, cringle, crinkle, and to crank, a., the root meaning, probably, to turn, twist. See {Cringe}.] 1. (Mach.) A bent portion of an axle, or shaft, or an arm keyed at right angles to the end of a shaft …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Crank axle — Crank Crank (kr[a^][ng]k), n. [OE. cranke; akin to E. cringe, cringle, crinkle, and to crank, a., the root meaning, probably, to turn, twist. See {Cringe}.] 1. (Mach.) A bent portion of an axle, or shaft, or an arm keyed at right angles to the… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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