Weltering
Welter Wel"ter, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Weltered}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Weltering}.] [Freq. of OE. walten to roll over, AS. wealtan; akin to LG. weltern, G. walzen to roll, to waltz, sich w["a]lzen to welter, OHG. walzan to roll, Icel. velta, Dan. v[ae]lte, Sw. v["a]ltra, v["a]lta; cf. Goth. waltjan; probably akin to E. wallow, well, v. i. [root]146. See {Well}, v. i., and cf. {Waltz}.] [1913 Webster] 1. To roll, as the body of an animal; to tumble about, especially in anything foul or defiling; to wallow. [1913 Webster]

When we welter in pleasures and idleness, then we eat and drink with drunkards. --Latimer. [1913 Webster]

These wizards welter in wealth's waves. --Spenser. [1913 Webster]

He must not float upon his watery bier Unwept, and welter to the parching wind, Without the meed of some melodious tear. --Milton. [1913 Webster]

The priests at the altar . . . weltering in their blood. --Landor. [1913 Webster]

2. To rise and fall, as waves; to tumble over, as billows. ``The weltering waves.'' --Milton. [1913 Webster]

Waves that, hardly weltering, die away. --Wordsworth. [1913 Webster]

Through this blindly weltering sea. --Trench. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • weltering — wel·ter || weltÉ™(r) n. confusion, turmoil; chaos, disorder; wallowing, rolling around in; welterweight v. wallow, be soaked (as in blood); be immersed or entangled in …   English contemporary dictionary

  • weltering — welˈtering adjective • • • Main Entry: ↑welter …   Useful english dictionary

  • Welter — Wel ter, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Weltered}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Weltering}.] [Freq. of OE. walten to roll over, AS. wealtan; akin to LG. weltern, G. walzen to roll, to waltz, sich w[ a]lzen to welter, OHG. walzan to roll, Icel. velta, Dan. v[ae]lte, Sw …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Weltered — Welter Wel ter, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Weltered}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Weltering}.] [Freq. of OE. walten to roll over, AS. wealtan; akin to LG. weltern, G. walzen to roll, to waltz, sich w[ a]lzen to welter, OHG. walzan to roll, Icel. velta, Dan.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • wallow — wallow, welter, grovel can imply heavy clumsy movement and, when the reference is to man, a debased, pitiable, or ignoble condition. Wallow basically implies a lurching or rolling to and fro (as of a pig in the mire or a ship in the trough of a… …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • welter — I. intransitive verb (weltered; weltering) Etymology: Middle English; akin to Middle Dutch welteren to roll, Old High German walzan, Lithuanian volioti, Latin volvere more at voluble Date: 14th century 1. a. writhe, toss; also wallow …   New Collegiate Dictionary

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