Week
Week Week, n. [OE. weke, wike, woke, wuke AS. weocu, wicu, wucu; akin to OS. wika, OFries. wike, D. week, G. woche, OHG. wohha, wehha, Icel. vika, Sw. vecka, Dan. uge, Goth. wik?, probably originally meaning, a succession or change, and akin to G. wechsel change, L. vicis turn, alternation, and E. weak. Cf. {Weak}.] A period of seven days, usually that reckoned from one Sabbath or Sunday to the next. [1913 Webster]

I fast twice in the week. --Luke xviii. 12. [1913 Webster]

Note: Although it [the week] did not enter into the calendar of the Greeks, and was not introduced at Rome till after the reign of Theodesius, it has been employed from time immemorial in almost all Eastern countries. --Encyc. Brit. [1913 Webster]

{Feast of Weeks}. See {Pentecost}, 1.

{Prophetic week}, a week of years, or seven years. --Dan. ix. 24.

{Week day}. See under {Day}. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • week — W1S1 [wi:k] n [: Old English; Origin: wicu] 1.) a period of seven days and nights, usually measured in Britain from Monday to Sunday and in the US from Sunday to Saturday once/twice/three times etc a week ▪ Letters were delivered twice a week… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • week — [ wik ] noun count *** a period of seven days, usually counted from a Sunday: He travels south two days a week. That left 15 dollars per week for food. last/next week: He will meet his uncle in Boston next week. a. a week in which particular… …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • week — [wēk] n. [ME weke < OE wicu with lengthened & lowered vowel, akin to Ger woche (OHG wohha) < IE * weig , to bend (see WEAK): basic sense “period of change”] 1. a period of seven days, esp. one beginning with Sunday and ending with Saturday… …   English World dictionary

  • week — /week/, n. 1. a period of seven successive days, usually understood as beginning with Sunday and ending with Saturday. 2. a period of seven successive days that begins with or includes an indicated day: the week of June 3; Christmas week. 3.… …   Universalium

  • week — O.E. wice, from P.Gmc. *wikon (Cf. O.N. vika, O.Fris. wike, M.Du. weke, O.H.G. wecha, Ger. woche), probably originally with the sense of a turning or succession (Cf. Goth. wikon in the course of, O.N. vika sea mile, originally change of oar …   Etymology dictionary

  • week — ► NOUN 1) a period of seven days. 2) the period of seven days generally reckoned from and to midnight on Saturday night. 3) chiefly Brit. (preceded by a specified day) a week after (that day). 4) the five days from Monday to Friday, or the time… …   English terms dictionary

  • Week — For more details on each day of the week, see Weekday names. For the TV station in the Peoria Bloomington, Illinois market, see WEEK TV. Weeks redirects here. For other uses, see Weeks (disambiguation). A week is a time unit equal to seven days.… …   Wikipedia

  • week — n. 1) to spend a week (somewhere) 2) last; next; this week 3) a week from (Tuesday) 4) by the week (she is paid by the week) 5) during the week 6) for a week (they came here for a week) 7) for weeks (she hasn t been here for weeks; AE also has:… …   Combinatory dictionary

  • week — [[t]wi͟ːk[/t]] ♦ weeks 1) N COUNT A week is a period of seven days. Some people consider that a week starts on Monday and ends on Sunday. I had a letter from my mother last week... This has been on my mind all week... I know a wonderful… …   English dictionary

  • week — noun ADJECTIVE ▪ last, past ▪ previous ▪ coming, following, next ▪ consecutive, successive …   Collocations dictionary

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