Weavers' shuttle
Weaver Weav"er, n. 1. One who weaves, or whose occupation is to weave. ``Weavers of linen.'' --P. Plowman. [1913 Webster]

2. (Zo["o]l.) A weaver bird. [1913 Webster]

3. (Zo["o]l.) An aquatic beetle of the genus {Gyrinus}. See {Whirling}. [1913 Webster]

{Weaver bird} (Zo["o]l.), any one of numerous species of Asiatic, Fast Indian, and African birds belonging to {Ploceus} and allied genera of the family {Ploceid[ae]}. Weaver birds resemble finches and sparrows in size, colors, and shape of the bill. They construct pensile nests composed of interlaced grass and other similar materials. In some of the species the nest is retort-shaped, with the opening at the bottom of the tube.

{Weavers' shuttle} (Zo["o]l.), an East Indian marine univalve shell ({Radius volva}); -- so called from its shape. See Illust. of {Shuttle shell}, under {Shuttle}. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

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