Weave
Weave Weave (w[=e]v), v. t. [imp. {Wove} (w[=o]v); p. p. {Woven} (w[=o]v"'n), {Wove}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Weaving}. The regular imp. & p. p. {Weaved} (w[=e]vd), is rarely used.] [OE. weven, AS. wefan; akin to D. weven, G. weben, OHG. weban, Icel. vefa, Sw. v["a]fva, Dan. v[ae]ve, Gr. "yfai`nein, v., "y`fos web, Skr. [=u]r[.n]av[=a]bhi spider, lit., wool weaver. Cf. {Waper}, {Waffle}, {Web}, {Weevil}, {Weft}, {Woof}.] [1913 Webster] 1. To unite, as threads of any kind, in such a manner as to form a texture; to entwine or interlace into a fabric; as, to weave wool, silk, etc.; hence, to unite by close connection or intermixture; to unite intimately. [1913 Webster]

This weaves itself, perforce, into my business. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

That in their green shops weave the smooth-haired silk To deck her sons. --Milton. [1913 Webster]

And for these words, thus woven into song. --Byron. [1913 Webster]

2. To form, as cloth, by interlacing threads; to compose, as a texture of any kind, by putting together textile materials; as, to weave broadcloth; to weave a carpet; hence, to form into a fabric; to compose; to fabricate; as, to weave the plot of a story. [1913 Webster]

When she weaved the sleided silk. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

Her starry wreaths the virgin jasmin weaves. --Ld. Lytton. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Synonyms:

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  • weave — [wēv] vt. WOVE or, chiefly for vt. 6 & vi. 2, weaved, woven or wove or, chiefly for vt. 6 & vi. 2, weaved, weaving, wove [ME weven < OE wefan, akin to ON vefa, Ger weben < IE * webh (> Gr hyphē) < base * (a)we , to plait, weave] 1. a) …   English World dictionary

  • weave — Ⅰ. weave [1] ► VERB (past wove; past part. woven or wove) 1) form (fabric) by interlacing long threads passing in one direction with others at a right angle to them. 2) (usu. as noun weaving) make fabric in this way. 3) …   English terms dictionary

  • Weave — Weave, n. A particular method or pattern of weaving; as, the cassimere weave. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • weave — (v.) O.E. wefan form by interlacing yarn (class V strong verb; past tense wæf, pp. wefen), from P.Gmc. *webanan (Cf. O.N. vefa, M.L.G., M.Du., Du. weven, O.H.G. weban, Ger. weben to weave ), from PIE *webh /*wobh (Cf. Skt. ubhnati he laces to …   Etymology dictionary

  • weave — weave, knit, crochet, braid, plait, tat mean to make a fabric or textile or to form an article by interlacing threads or strands of material. Weave usually implies crossing rows of threads or strands interlaced into a web, irrespective of method …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • Weave — Weave, v. i. 1. To practice weaving; to work with a loom. [1913 Webster] 2. To become woven or interwoven. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • weave — index incorporate (include) Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …   Law dictionary

  • weave — verb. It is worth pointing out that there are two words involved here, although their meanings overlap in figurative applications. The one meaning ‘to form fabric by interlacing threads’ is from Old English, and the other, meaning ‘to take a… …   Modern English usage

  • weave — [v] blend, unite; contrive braid, build, careen, complect, complicate, compose, construct, create, criss cross, crochet, cue, entwine, fabricate, fold, fuse, incorporate, interfold, interlace, interlink, intermingle, intertwine, introduce, knit,… …   New thesaurus

  • weave — I n. a plain; satin; twill weave II v. 1) (C) she wove a basket for us; or: she wove us a basket 2) (d; tr.) to weave around, round (she wove the story around a specific theme) 3) (d; tr.) to weave from, out of (she wants to weave a scarf from… …   Combinatory dictionary

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