Weather
Weather Weath"er, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Weathered}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Weathering}.] [1913 Webster] 1. To expose to the air; to air; to season by exposure to air. [1913 Webster]

[An eagle] soaring through his wide empire of the air To weather his broad sails. --Spenser. [1913 Webster]

This gear lacks weathering. --Latimer. [1913 Webster]

2. Hence, to sustain the trying effect of; to bear up against and overcome; to sustain; to endure; to resist; as, to weather the storm. [1913 Webster]

For I can weather the roughest gale. --Longfellow. [1913 Webster]

You will weather the difficulties yet. --F. W. Robertson. [1913 Webster]

3. (Naut.) To sail or pass to the windward of; as, to weather a cape; to weather another ship. [1913 Webster]

4. (Falconry) To place (a hawk) unhooded in the open air. --Encyc. Brit. [1913 Webster]

{To weather a point}. (a) (Naut.) To pass a point of land, leaving it on the lee side. (b) Hence, to gain or accomplish anything against opposition.

{To weather out}, to encounter successfully, though with difficulty; as, to weather out a storm. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Weather — Weath er, n. [OE. weder, AS. weder; akin to OS. wedar, OFries. weder, D. weder, we[^e]r, G. wetter, OHG. wetar, Icel. ve[eth]r, Dan. veir, Sw. v[ a]der wind, air, weather, and perhaps to OSlav. vedro fair weather; or perhaps to Lith. vetra storm …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Weather — Weath er, a. (Naut.) Being toward the wind, or windward opposed to lee; as, weather bow, weather braces, weather gauge, weather lifts, weather quarter, weather shrouds, etc. [1913 Webster] {Weather gauge}. (a) (Naut.) The position of a ship to… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • weather — [weth′ər] n. [ME weder < OE, akin to ON vethr, Ger wetter < IE base * we , * awe , to blow > WIND2, OSlav vedro, fair weather] 1. the general condition of the atmosphere at a particular time and place, with regard to the temperature,… …   English World dictionary

  • weather — (n.) O.E. weder, from P.Gmc. *wedran (Cf. O.S. wedar, O.N. veðr, O.Fris., M.Du., Du. weder, O.H.G. wetar, Ger. Wetter storm, wind, weather ), from PIE *we dhro , weather, from root *we to blow (see WIND (Cf …   Etymology dictionary

  • weather — ► NOUN 1) the state of the atmosphere at a place and time as regards temperature, wind, rain, etc. 2) (before another noun ) denoting the side from which the wind is blowing; windward. Contrasted with LEE(Cf. ↑lee). ► VERB 1) wear away or change… …   English terms dictionary

  • weather — weath‧er [ˈweDə ǁ ər] verb [transitive] if a company, business etc weathers a difficult situation, it manages to come through it safely: • Small businesses were less able to weather the recession. • The company has weathered the slump better than …   Financial and business terms

  • Weather — assisted migration blizzaster climate porn Fogust geomythology gigantic jet Marchuary megacryometeor …   New words

  • Weather — Weath er, v. i. To undergo or endure the action of the atmosphere; to suffer meteorological influences; sometimes, to wear away, or alter, under atmospheric influences; to suffer waste by weather. [1913 Webster] The organisms . . . seem… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • weather — [n] atmospheric conditions climate, clime, elements; concepts 522,524 weather [v] endure acclimate, bear the brunt of*, bear up against*, become toughened, brave, come through, expose, get through, grow hardened, grow strong, harden, make it,… …   New thesaurus

  • weather — index atmosphere, bear (tolerate), endure (last), endure (suffer), erode, maintain ( …   Law dictionary

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