Wean
Wean Wean, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Weaned}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Weaning}.] [OE. wenen, AS. wenian, wennan, to accustom; akin to D. wennen, G. gew["o]hnen, OHG. giwennan, Icel. venja, Sw. v["a]nja, Dan. v[ae]nne, Icel. vanr accustomed, wont; cf. AS. [=a]wenian to wean, G. entw["o]hnen. See {Wont}, a.] [1913 Webster] 1. To accustom and reconcile, as a child or other young animal, to a want or deprivation of mother's milk; to take from the breast or udder; to cause to cease to depend on the mother nourishment. [1913 Webster]

And the child grew, and was weaned; and Abraham made a great feast the same day that Isaac was weaned. --Gen. xxi. 8. [1913 Webster]

2. Hence, to detach or alienate the affections of, from any object of desire; to reconcile to the want or loss of anything. ``Wean them from themselves.'' --Shak. [1913 Webster]

The troubles of age were intended . . . to wean us gradually from our fondness of life. --Swift. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • wean — wean·el; wean·er; wean·ie; wean·ly; wean·yer; wean; wean·ling; …   English syllables

  • wean — [wi:n] v [T] [: Old English; Origin: wenian] to gradually stop feeding a baby or young animal on its mother s milk and start giving it ordinary food wean sb onto sth ▪ It s time to start weaning her onto solid foods. wean off/from [wean sb… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • Wean — Wean, n. A weanling; a young child. [1913 Webster] I, being but a yearling wean. Mrs. Browning. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • wean — Ⅰ. wean [1] ► VERB 1) accustom (a young mammal) to food other than its mother s milk. 2) (often wean off) make (someone) give up a habit or addiction. 3) (be weaned on) be strongly influenced by (something) from an early age. ORIGIN Old English …   English terms dictionary

  • wean — O.E. wenian to accustom, from P.Gmc. *wanjanan (Cf. O.N. venja, Du. wennen, O.H.G. giwennan, Ger. gewöhnen to accustom ), from *wanaz accustomed (related to WONT (Cf. wont)). The sense of weaning a child from the breast in O.E. was generally… …   Etymology dictionary

  • wean — wean1 [wēn] vt. [ME wenen < OE wenian, to accustom, train, with sense of awenian, to wean < a (< af , away) + wenian < IE base * wen , to desire, attain, be satisfied > L venus, love] 1. to cause (a child or young animal) to become …   English World dictionary

  • wean — index alienate (estrange), withdraw Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …   Law dictionary

  • wean — *estrange, alienate, disaffect Analogous words: *separate, part, divide, sunder, sever, divorce Antonyms: addict …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • wean — v. 1) (D; tr.) to wean from (to wean a calf from its mother) 2) (misc.) to wean smb. away from bad company * * * [wiːn] (misc.) to wean smb. away from bad company (D; tr.) to wean from (to wean a calf from its mother) …   Combinatory dictionary

  • wean — wean1 [ win ] verb transitive to make a baby stop taking its mother s milk and start to eat solid food a. wean someone off/from something to make someone gradually stop depending on something that they like and have become used to, especially a… …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”