Water privilege
Privilege Priv"i*lege, n. [F. privil[`e]ge, L. privilegium an ordinance or law against or in favor of an individual; privus private + lex, legis, law. See {Private}, and {Legal}.] [1913 Webster] 1. A peculiar benefit, advantage, or favor; a right or immunity not enjoyed by others or by all; special enjoyment of a good, or exemption from an evil or burden; a prerogative; advantage; franchise. [1913 Webster]

He pleads the legal privilege of a Roman. --Kettlewell. [1913 Webster]

The privilege birthright was a double portion. --Locke. [1913 Webster]

A people inheriting privileges, franchises, and liberties. --Burke. [1913 Webster]

2. (Stockbroker's Cant) See {Call}, {Put}, {Spread}, etc. [1913 Webster]

{Breach of privilege}. See under {Breach}.

{Question of privilege} (Parliamentary practice), a question which concerns the security of a member of a legislative body in his special privileges as such.

{Water privilege}, the advantage of having machinery driven by a stream, or a place affording such advantage. [ U. S.]

{Writ of privilege} (Law), a writ to deliver a privileged person from custody when arrested in a civil suit. --Blackstone. [1913 Webster]

Syn: Prerogative; immunity; franchise; right; claim; liberty.

Usage: {Privilege}, {Prerogative}. Privilege, among the Romans, was something conferred upon an individual by a private law; and hence, it denotes some peculiar benefit or advantage, some right or immunity, not enjoyed by the world at large. Prerogative, among the Romans, was the right of voting first; and, hence, it denotes a right of precedence, or of doing certain acts, or enjoying certain privileges, to the exclusion of others. It is the privilege of a member of Congress not to be called in question elsewhere for words uttered in debate. It is the prerogative of the president to nominate judges and executive officers. It is the privilege of a Christian child to be instructed in the true religion. It is the prerogative of a parent to govern and direct his children. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Water privilege — Wa ter priv i*lege The advantage of using water as a mechanical power; also, the place where water is, or may be, so used. See under {Privilege}. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • water privilege — noun : the right to use water especially as a source of mechanical power; also : a place (as a mill site) where water is or may be so used * * * water privilege noun 1. The right to the use of water, esp for driving machinery 2. A place where… …   Useful english dictionary

  • water privilege — An incorporeal hereditament of an independent nature, not constituting a servitude upon some other thing. Union Falls Power Co. v Marinette County, 238 Wis 134, 298 NW 598, 134 ALR 958. See water license; water right …   Ballentine's law dictionary

  • water privilege — noun Date: 1804 the right to use water especially as a source of mechanical power …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • Privilege — Priv i*lege, n. [F. privil[ e]ge, L. privilegium an ordinance or law against or in favor of an individual; privus private + lex, legis, law. See {Private}, and {Legal}.] [1913 Webster] 1. A peculiar benefit, advantage, or favor; a right or… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Water power — Wa ter pow er 1. The power of water employed to move machinery, etc. [1913 Webster] 2. A fall of water which may be used to drive machinery; a site for a water mill; a water privilege. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • water right — In the general sense, the legal right to use water. An easement, either in gross or appurtenant to other property, in the use of water. 56 Am J1st Water §§ 242, 243. A usufructuary right or interest in a stream or other body of water, or the… …   Ballentine's law dictionary

  • water license — A license to use the waters of a stream, as for power. 56 Am J1st Water § 258. See water privilege …   Ballentine's law dictionary

  • Privilege revocation — is the act of an entity giving up some, or all of, the privileges they possess, or some authority taking those (privileged) rights away. Information theory Honoring the Principle of least privilege at a granularity provided by the base system… …   Wikipedia

  • water power — 1. the power of running or falling water, used to drive machinery, etc., or capable of being so used 2. a fall of water that can be so used 3. a water right or privilege owned by a mill: Also waterpower n …   English World dictionary

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