wastour
Wastor \Wast"or\, n. A waster; a thief. [Obs. or R.] [Written also {wastour}.] --Chaucer. Southey. [1913 Webster]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

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  • thief — Waster Wast er, n. [OE. wastour, OF. wasteor, gasteor. See {Waste}, v. t.] [1913 Webster] 1. One who, or that which, wastes; one who squanders; one who consumes or expends extravagantly; a spendthrift; a prodigal. [1913 Webster] He also that is… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Waster — Wast er, n. [OE. wastour, OF. wasteor, gasteor. See {Waste}, v. t.] [1913 Webster] 1. One who, or that which, wastes; one who squanders; one who consumes or expends extravagantly; a spendthrift; a prodigal. [1913 Webster] He also that is slothful …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Wastor — Wast or, n. A waster; a thief. [Obs. or R.] [Written also {wastour}.] Chaucer. Southey. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • waster — /way steuhr/, n. 1. a person or thing that wastes time, money, etc. 2. a piece of ceramic ware warped, cracked, or melted during firing. 3. a spendthrift or wastrel. 4. a destroyer: The Vandals were wasters of cities. 5. Chiefly Brit. wastrel… …   Universalium

  • Winner and Waster — (Wynnere and Wastour) (ca. 1352–1353)    Winner and Waster is a DREAM VISION poem of 503 extant lines, written in a Northwest Midland dialect of MIDDLE ENGLISH. The poem is a political ALLEGORY composed during the reign of King EDWARD III, who… …   Encyclopedia of medieval literature

  • waster — wast•er [[t]ˈweɪ stər[/t]] n. 1) a person or thing that wastes money, etc 2) a destroyer; ruiner • Etymology: 1300–50; ME < AF wastere, wastour (see or II) …   From formal English to slang

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