Walloped
Wallop Wal"lop, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Walloped}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Walloping}.] [Probably fr. AS. weallan to spring up, to boil or bubble. [root]147. See {Well}, n. & v. i.] [1913 Webster] 1. To boil with a continued bubbling or heaving and rolling, with noise. [Prov. Eng.] --Brockett. [1913 Webster]

2. To move in a rolling, cumbersome manner; to waddle. [Prov. Eng.] --Halliwell. [1913 Webster]

3. To be slatternly. [Prov. Eng.] --Halliwell. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • walloped — wal·lop || wÉ‘lÉ™p / wÉ’l n. heavy blow, thump; ability to give heavy blows; quality of making a strong impression (Informal) v. strike, give heavy blow; decisively conquer the opposition …   English contemporary dictionary

  • List of Issues of The Magnet — Issues of The Magnet, published by Amalgamated Press between 1908 and 1940. References in brackets refer to reprints by the Howard Baker Press and the Greyfriars Book Club. 1908 The Making of Harry Wharton (Book Club 3) The Taming of Harry (Book… …   Wikipedia

  • wallop — walloper, n. /wol euhp/, v.t. 1. to beat soundly; thrash. 2. Informal. to strike with a vigorous blow; belt; sock: After two strikes, he walloped the ball out of the park. 3. Informal. to defeat thoroughly, as in a game. 4. Chiefly Scot. to… …   Universalium

  • wallop — [[t]wɒ̱ləp[/t]] wallops, walloping, walloped VERB If you wallop someone or something, you hit them very hard, often causing a dull sound. [INFORMAL] [V n prep] Once, she walloped me over the head with a frying pan. [V n] ...a big serving tennis… …   English dictionary

  • wallop — I UK [ˈwɒləp] / US [ˈwɑləp] verb [transitive] Word forms wallop : present tense I/you/we/they wallop he/she/it wallops present participle walloping past tense walloped past participle walloped informal 1) to hit someone or something very hard 2)… …   English dictionary

  • wallop — [“walap] 1. n. a hard blow. □ She planted a hard wallop on his right shoulder. □ I got quite a wallop when I walked into the door. 2. tv. to strike someone or something hard. □ I walloped him hard on the shoulder, but he kept on laughing …   Dictionary of American slang and colloquial expressions

  • Pot-walloper — Pot wal lop*er, n. 1. A voter in certain boroughs of England, where, before the passage of the reform bill of 1832, the qualification for suffrage was to have boiled (walloped) his own pot in the parish for six months. [1913 Webster] 2. One who… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Wallop — Wal lop, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Walloped}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Walloping}.] [Probably fr. AS. weallan to spring up, to boil or bubble. [root]147. See {Well}, n. & v. i.] [1913 Webster] 1. To boil with a continued bubbling or heaving and rolling, with… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Walloping — Wallop Wal lop, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Walloped}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Walloping}.] [Probably fr. AS. weallan to spring up, to boil or bubble. [root]147. See {Well}, n. & v. i.] [1913 Webster] 1. To boil with a continued bubbling or heaving and rolling …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Armidale, New South Wales — Infobox Australian Place | type = city name = Armidale state = New South Wales caption = Looking south across Armidale City lga = Armidale Dumaresq Council county = Sandon postcode = 2350 est = 1849 pop = 24,660 area = propval =… …   Wikipedia

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