Wallop
Wallop Wal"lop, v. i. [Cf. OFlem. walop a gallop; of uncertain origin. Cf. {Gallop}.] To move quickly, but with great effort; to gallop. [Prov. Eng. & Scot.] [1913 Webster]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

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  • Wallop — is an Internet social network service that originated from Microsoft Research. The company itself however is a separate startup entity.Business ModelCreated by Microsoft, Wallop is backed by $13 million from Microsoft and venture capitalists… …   Wikipedia

  • wallop — [n] strong hit bash, belt, blow, bop, bump, clash, collision, crash, haymaker*, impact, jar, jolt, kick, percussion, punch, shock, slam, slug, smack, smash, thump, thwack*, whack; concept 189 wallop [v1] beat, hit bam, bash, batter, belt, blast,… …   New thesaurus

  • Wallop — Wal lop, v. t. 1. To beat soundly; to flog; to whip. [Prov. Eng., Scot., & Colloq. U. S.] [1913 Webster] 2. To wrap up temporarily. [Prov. Eng.] [1913 Webster] 3. To throw or tumble over. [Prov. Eng.] [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Wallop — Wal lop, n. 1. A thick piece of fat. Halliwell. [1913 Webster] 2. A blow. [Prov. Eng., Scot., & Colloq. U. S.] [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Wallop — Wal lop, n. A quick, rolling movement; a gallop. [Prov. Eng. & Scot.] [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Wallop — Wal lop, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Walloped}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Walloping}.] [Probably fr. AS. weallan to spring up, to boil or bubble. [root]147. See {Well}, n. & v. i.] [1913 Webster] 1. To boil with a continued bubbling or heaving and rolling, with… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • wallop — (v.) late 14c., to gallop, possibly from O.N.Fr. *waloper (13c.), probably from Frankish *walalaupan to run well (Cf. O.H.G. wela well and Old Low Franconian loupon to run, leap ). The verb meaning to thrash (1820) and the noun meaning heavy blow …   Etymology dictionary

  • wallop — The verb has inflected forms walloped, walloping …   Modern English usage

  • wallop — informal ► VERB (walloped, walloping) 1) strike or hit very hard. 2) heavily defeat (an opponent). 3) (walloping) strikingly large. ► NOUN 1) a heavy blow or punch. 2) …   English terms dictionary

  • wallop — [wä′ləp] vi. [ME walopen, to gallop < NormFr waloper (OFr galoper): see GALLOP] [Informal or Dial.] Informal Dial. 1. a) to move along in a rapid, reckless, awkward way b) to move heavily and clumsily; flounder 2. to boil vigorously, with… …   English World dictionary

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