Walk Walk (w[add]k), v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Walked}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Walking}.] [OE. walken, probably from AS. wealcan to roll, turn, revolve, akin to D. walken to felt hats, to work a hat, G. walken to full, OHG. walchan to beat, to full, Icel. v[=a]lka to roll, to stamp, Sw. valka to full, to roll, Dan. valke to full; cf. Skr. valg to spring; but cf. also AS. weallian to roam, ramble, G. wallen. [root]130.] [1913 Webster] 1. To move along on foot; to advance by steps; to go on at a moderate pace; specifically, of two-legged creatures, to proceed at a slower or faster rate, but without running, or lifting one foot entirely before the other touches the ground. [1913 Webster]

At the end of twelve months, he walked in the palace of the kingdom of Babylon. --Dan. iv. 29. [1913 Webster]

When Peter was come down out of the ship, he walked on the water, to go to Jesus. --Matt. xiv. 29. [1913 Webster]

Note: In the walk of quadrupeds, there are always two, and for a brief space there are three, feet on the ground at once, but never four. [1913 Webster]

2. To move or go on the feet for exercise or amusement; to take one's exercise; to ramble. [1913 Webster]

3. To be stirring; to be abroad; to go restlessly about; -- said of things or persons expected to remain quiet, as a sleeping person, or the spirit of a dead person; to go about as a somnambulist or a specter. [1913 Webster]

I have heard, but not believed, the spirits of the dead May walk again. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

When was it she last walked? --Shak. [1913 Webster]

4. To be in motion; to act; to move; to wag. [Obs.] ``Her tongue did walk in foul reproach.'' --Spenser. [1913 Webster]

Do you think I'd walk in any plot? --B. Jonson. [1913 Webster]

I heard a pen walking in the chimney behind the cloth. --Latimer. [1913 Webster]

5. To behave; to pursue a course of life; to conduct one's self. [1913 Webster]

We walk perversely with God, and he will walk crookedly toward us. --Jer. Taylor. [1913 Webster]

6. To move off; to depart. [Obs. or Colloq.] [1913 Webster]

He will make their cows and garrans to walk. --Spenser. [1913 Webster]

{To walk} in, to go in; to enter, as into a house.

{To walk after the flesh} (Script.), to indulge sensual appetites, and to live in sin. --Rom. viii. 1.

{To walk after the Spirit} (Script.), to be guided by the counsels and influences of the Spirit, and by the word of God. --Rom. viii. 1.

{To walk by faith} (Script.), to live in the firm belief of the gospel and its promises, and to rely on Christ for salvation. --2 Cor. v. 7.

{To walk in darkness} (Script.), to live in ignorance, error, and sin. --1 John i. 6.

{To walk in the flesh} (Script.), to live this natural life, which is subject to infirmities and calamities. --2 Cor. x. 3.

{To walk in the light} (Script.), to live in the practice of religion, and to enjoy its consolations. --1 John i. 7.

{To walk over}, in racing, to go over a course at a walk; -- said of a horse when there is no other entry; hence, colloquially, to gain an easy victory in any contest.

{To walk through the fire} (Script.), to be exercised with severe afflictions. --Isa. xliii. 2.

{To walk with God} (Script.), to live in obedience to his commands, and have communion with him. [1913 Webster]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Walking — (also called ambulation) is the main form of animal locomotion on land, distinguished from running and crawling. [http://www.runningplanet.com/training/running versus walking.html Walking v. running] [http://www.bartleby.com/28/15.html Walking by …   Wikipedia

  • Walking — Walk ing, a. & n. from {Walk}, v. [1913 Webster] {Walking beam}. See {Beam}, 10. {Walking crane}, a kind of traveling crane. See under {Crane}. {Walking fern}. (Bot.) See {Walking leaf}, below. {Walking fish} (Zo[ o]l.), any one of numerous… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • walking — [wôk′iŋ] adj. 1. a) that walks b) that is able to walk 2. for use by a walker, hiker, etc. 3. characterized by walking, hiking, etc. [a walking trip through Wales] 4. in human form [a walking encyclopedia ] …   English World dictionary

  • walking — (adj.) c.1400, prp. adjective from WALK (Cf. walk) (v.). Walking sickness, one in which the sufferer is able to get about and is not bed ridden, is from 1846. Walking wounded is recorded from 1917. Walking bass is attested from 1939 in jazz slang …   Etymology dictionary

  • Walking — (von englisch: to walk „gehen“ und entsprechend ausgesprochen) ist die freizeitsportliche Variante der wettkampforientierten Sportart Gehen. Eine moderne Variante ist das Nordic Walking, bei dem zusätzlich Stöcke – wie beim Skilanglauf –… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • walking — /waw king/, adj. 1. considered as a person who can or does walk or something that walks: The hospital is caring for six walking patients. He s walking proof that people can lose weight quickly. 2. used for or as an aid in walking: She put on her… …   Universalium

  • walking — n. & adj. in senses of WALK n. Phrases and idioms: walking delegate a trade union official who visits members and their employers for discussions. walking dictionary (or encyclopaedia) colloq. a person having a wide general knowledge. walking… …   Useful english dictionary

  • walking — /ˈwɔkɪŋ/ (say wawking) adjective 1. that walks; able to walk. 2. used for or in walking: walking shoes. 3. characterised by or consisting of walking: a walking holiday. 4. of or relating to an implement, machine, etc., drawn by an animal and… …   Australian English dictionary

  • walking — I. noun Date: 14th century 1. the action of one that walks < walking is good exercise > 2. the condition of a surface for one going on foot < the walking is slippery > II. adjective Date: 15th century 1 …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • walking — walk•ing [[t]ˈwɔ kɪŋ[/t]] adj. 1) able to walk; ambulatory: walking patients[/ex] 2) living; live: He s walking proof that people can lose weight quickly[/ex] 3) designed esp. for walking: walking shoes[/ex] 4) characterized or accomplished by… …   From formal English to slang

  • walking — walk|ing1 [ˈwo:kıŋ US ˈwo:k ] n [U] 1.) especially BrE the activity or sport of going for walks, especially in the countryside or mountains →↑hiking, rambling ↑rambling ▪ We went walking in the hills. walking boots/shoes walking holiday/tour etc… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”