Voluble stem
Voluble Vol"u*ble, a. [L. volubilis, fr. volvere, volutum, to roll, to turn round; akin to Gr. ? to infold, to inwrap, ? to roll, G. welle a wave: cf. F. voluble. Cf. F. {Well} of water, {Convolvulus}, {Devolve}, {Involve}, {Revolt}, {Vault} an arch, {Volume}, {Volute}.] [1913 Webster] 1. Easily rolling or turning; easily set in motion; apt to roll; rotating; as, voluble particles of matter. [1913 Webster]

2. Moving with ease and smoothness in uttering words; of rapid speech; nimble in speaking; glib; as, a flippant, voluble, tongue. [1913 Webster]

[Cassio,] a knave very voluble. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

Note: Voluble was used formerly to indicate readiness of speech merely, without any derogatory suggestion. ``A grave and voluble eloquence.'' --Bp. Hacket. [1913 Webster]

3. Changeable; unstable; fickle. [Obs.] [1913 Webster]

4. (Bot.) Having the power or habit of turning or twining; as, the voluble stem of hop plants. [1913 Webster]

{Voluble stem} (Bot.), a stem that climbs by winding, or twining, round another body. [1913 Webster] -- {Vol"u*ble*ness}, n. -- {Vol"u*bly}, adv. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

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  • Voluble — Vol u*ble, a. [L. volubilis, fr. volvere, volutum, to roll, to turn round; akin to Gr. ? to infold, to inwrap, ? to roll, G. welle a wave: cf. F. voluble. Cf. F. {Well} of water, {Convolvulus}, {Devolve}, {Involve}, {Revolt}, {Vault} an arch,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Volubleness — Voluble Vol u*ble, a. [L. volubilis, fr. volvere, volutum, to roll, to turn round; akin to Gr. ? to infold, to inwrap, ? to roll, G. welle a wave: cf. F. voluble. Cf. F. {Well} of water, {Convolvulus}, {Devolve}, {Involve}, {Revolt}, {Vault} an… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Volubly — Voluble Vol u*ble, a. [L. volubilis, fr. volvere, volutum, to roll, to turn round; akin to Gr. ? to infold, to inwrap, ? to roll, G. welle a wave: cf. F. voluble. Cf. F. {Well} of water, {Convolvulus}, {Devolve}, {Involve}, {Revolt}, {Vault} an… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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  • speech — I (New American Roget s College Thesaurus) Oral communication Nouns 1. speech, talk, faculty of speech; locution, parlance, expression, vernacular, oral communication, word of mouth, parole, palaver, prattle; effusion, discourse; soliloquy;… …   English dictionary for students

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