Vitiating
Vitiate Vi"ti*ate, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Vitiated}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Vitiating}.] [L. vitiatus, p. p. vitiare to vitiate, fr. vitium a fault, vice. See {Vice} a fault.] [Written also {viciate}.] 1. To make vicious, faulty, or imperfect; to render defective; to injure the substance or qualities of; to impair; to contaminate; to spoil; as, exaggeration vitiates a style of writing; sewer gas vitiates the air. [1913 Webster]

A will vitiated and growth out of love with the truth disposes the understanding to error and delusion. --South. [1913 Webster]

Without care it may be used to vitiate our minds. --Burke. [1913 Webster]

This undistinguishing complaisance will vitiate the taste of readers. --Garth. [1913 Webster]

2. To cause to fail of effect, either wholly or in part; to make void; to destroy, as the validity or binding force of an instrument or transaction; to annul; as, any undue influence exerted on a jury vitiates their verdict; fraud vitiates a contract. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

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  • viciate — Vitiate Vi ti*ate, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Vitiated}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Vitiating}.] [L. vitiatus, p. p. vitiare to vitiate, fr. vitium a fault, vice. See {Vice} a fault.] [Written also {viciate}.] 1. To make vicious, faulty, or imperfect; to render… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Vitiate — Vi ti*ate, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Vitiated}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Vitiating}.] [L. vitiatus, p. p. vitiare to vitiate, fr. vitium a fault, vice. See {Vice} a fault.] [Written also {viciate}.] 1. To make vicious, faulty, or imperfect; to render… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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