Vital Vi"tal, a. [F., fr. L. vitalis, fr. vita life; akin to vivere to live. See {Vivid}.] 1. Belonging or relating to life, either animal or vegetable; as, vital energies; vital functions; vital actions. [1913 Webster]

2. Contributing to life; necessary to, or supporting, life; as, vital blood. [1913 Webster]

Do the heavens afford him vital food? --Spenser. [1913 Webster]

And vital virtue infused, and vital warmth. --Milton. [1913 Webster]

3. Containing life; living. ``Spirits that live throughout, vital in every part.'' --Milton. [1913 Webster]

4. Being the seat of life; being that on which life depends; mortal. [1913 Webster]

The dart flew on, and pierced a vital part. --Pope. [1913 Webster]

5. Very necessary; highly important; essential. [1913 Webster]

A competence is vital to content. --Young. [1913 Webster]

6. Capable of living; in a state to live; viable. [R.] [1913 Webster]

Pythagoras and Hippocrates . . . affirm the birth of the seventh month to be vital. --Sir T. Browne. [1913 Webster]

{Vital air}, oxygen gas; -- so called because essential to animal life. [Obs.]

{Vital capacity} (Physiol.), the breathing capacity of the lungs; -- expressed by the number of cubic inches of air which can be forcibly exhaled after a full inspiration.

{Vital force}. (Biol.) See under {Force}. The vital forces, according to Cope, are nerve force (neurism), growth force (bathmism), and thought force (phrenism), all under the direction and control of the vital principle. Apart from the phenomena of consciousness, vital actions no longer need to be considered as of a mysterious and unfathomable character, nor vital force as anything other than a form of physical energy derived from, and convertible into, other well-known forces of nature.

{Vital functions} (Physiol.), those functions or actions of the body on which life is directly dependent, as the circulation of the blood, digestion, etc.

{Vital principle}, an immaterial force, to which the functions peculiar to living beings are ascribed.

{Vital statistics}, statistics respecting the duration of life, and the circumstances affecting its duration.

{Vital tripod}. (Physiol.) See under {Tripod}.

{Vital vessels} (Bot.), a name for latex tubes, now disused. See {Latex}. [1913 Webster]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.


Look at other dictionaries:

  • vital — vital …   Dictionnaire des rimes

  • vital — vital …   Deutsch Wörterbuch

  • vital — vital, ale, aux [ vital, o ] adj. • 1380; lat. vitalis, de vita « vie » 1 ♦ Qui concerne, constitue la vie. Cycle vital. Propriétés, fonctions vitales. Les besoins vitaux de l individu. ♢ Philos. Principe vital, force vitale : réalité énergétique …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • Vital — may refer to:* vitalism, the doctrine that life cannot be explained solely by mechanism * vitalism (Jainism), the Jain teacher Mahāvīra s philosophy * Vital, the English name of a number of Roman Catholic saints named Vitalis in Latin * Vitals ,… …   Wikipedia

  • Vital — (lebenskräftig, lebenswichtig, munter) steht für Männlicher Vorname. Bekannte Namensträger: Joseph Vital Kopp, Schweizer Theologe und Schriftsteller (1906–1966) Vital Borkelmans, Fußballspieler (* 1963) Vital Julian Frey, Schweizer Cembalist (*… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • vital — VITÁL, Ă, vitali, e, adj. 1. Care este caracteristic sau esenţial pentru viaţă, în care rezidă viaţa; de viaţă, al vieţii. 2. Foarte important, fundamental, esenţial, de bază; indispensabil. – Din fr. vital, lat. vitalis. Trimis de ana zecheru,… …   Dicționar Român

  • vital — [vīt′ l] adj. [ME < MFr < L vitalis, vital < vita, life, akin to vivere, to live: see BIO ] 1. of, concerned with, or manifesting life [vital energy] 2. a) necessary or essential to life; being a source or support of life [vital organs]… …   English World dictionary

  • vital — vital, ale (vi tal, ta l ) adj. 1°   Qui appartient à la vie, qui sert à la conservation de la vie. •   Les physiologistes ont prouvé que les mouvements vitaux sont le produit des impressions reçues par les parties sensibles, CABANIS Instit. Mém …   Dictionnaire de la Langue Française d'Émile Littré

  • vital — Adj kräftig, lebendig erw. fremd. Erkennbar fremd (19. Jh.) Entlehnung. Entlehnt aus frz. vital, dieses aus l. vītālis Lebenskraft habend , zu l. vīta Leben , zu l. vīvere leben . Abstraktum: Vitalität.    Ebenso nndl. vital, ne. vital, nfrz.… …   Etymologisches Wörterbuch der deutschen sprache

  • VITAL — VITAL, Italian family which produced numerous scholars of whom the most noted were: JOSEPH VITAL (15th–16th century), a talented scribe, was especially noted for his precision in writing tefillin, which were widely known as Tefillin Rav Calabrash …   Encyclopedia of Judaism

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