Vienna caustic
Vienna paste Vi*en"na paste` (Pharm.) A caustic application made up of equal parts of caustic potash and quicklime; -- called also {Vienna caustic}. [1913 Webster]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

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