Vainest
Vain Vain, a. [Compar. {Vainer}; superl. {Vainest}.] [F. vain, L. vanus empty, void, vain. Cf. {Vanish}, {Vanity}, {Vaunt} to boast.] [1913 Webster] 1. Having no real substance, value, or importance; empty; void; worthless; unsatisfying. ``Thy vain excuse.'' --Shak. [1913 Webster]

Every man walketh in a vain show. --Ps. xxxix. 6. [1913 Webster]

Let no man deceive you with vain words. --Eph. v. 6. [1913 Webster]

Vain pomp, and glory of this world, I hate ye! --Shak. [1913 Webster]

Vain visdom all, and false philosophy. --Milton. [1913 Webster]

2. Destitute of forge or efficacy; effecting no purpose; fruitless; ineffectual; as, vain toil; a vain attempt. [1913 Webster]

Bring no more vain oblations. --Isa. i. 13. [1913 Webster]

Vain is the force of man To crush the pillars which the pile sustain. --Dryden. [1913 Webster]

3. Proud of petty things, or of trifling attainments; having a high opinion of one's own accomplishments with slight reason; conceited; puffed up; inflated. [1913 Webster]

But wilt thou know, O vain man, that faith apart from works is barren? --James ii. 20 (Rev. Ver.). [1913 Webster]

The minstrels played on every side, Vain of their art. --Dryden. [1913 Webster]

4. Showy; ostentatious. [1913 Webster]

Load some vain church with old theatric state. --Pope. [1913 Webster]

Syn: Empty; worthless; fruitless; ineffectual; idle; unreal; shadowy; showy; ostentatious; light; inconstant; deceitful; delusive; unimportant; trifling. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

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