Up helm
Up Up ([u^]p), adv. [AS. up, upp, [=u]p; akin to OFries. up, op, D. op, OS. [=u]p, OHG. [=u]f, G. auf, Icel. & Sw. upp, Dan. op, Goth. iup, and probably to E. over. See {Over}.] [1913 Webster] 1. Aloft; on high; in a direction contrary to that of gravity; toward or in a higher place or position; above; -- the opposite of {down}. [1913 Webster]

But up or down, By center or eccentric, hard to tell. --Milton. [1913 Webster]

2. Hence, in many derived uses, specifically: [1913 Webster] (a) From a lower to a higher position, literally or figuratively; as, from a recumbent or sitting position; from the mouth, toward the source, of a river; from a dependent or inferior condition; from concealment; from younger age; from a quiet state, or the like; -- used with verbs of motion expressed or implied. [1913 Webster]

But they presumed to go up unto the hilltop. --Num. xiv. 44. [1913 Webster]

I am afflicted and ready to die from my youth up. --Ps. lxxxviii. 15. [1913 Webster]

Up rose the sun, and up rose Emelye. --Chaucer. [1913 Webster]

We have wrought ourselves up into this degree of Christian indifference. --Atterbury. [1913 Webster] (b) In a higher place or position, literally or figuratively; in the state of having arisen; in an upright, or nearly upright, position; standing; mounted on a horse; in a condition of elevation, prominence, advance, proficiency, excitement, insurrection, or the like; -- used with verbs of rest, situation, condition, and the like; as, to be up on a hill; the lid of the box was up; prices are up. [1913 Webster]

And when the sun was up, they were scorched. --Matt. xiii. 6. [1913 Webster]

Those that were up themselves kept others low. --Spenser. [1913 Webster]

Helen was up -- was she? --Shak. [1913 Webster]

Rebels there are up, And put the Englishmen unto the sword. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

His name was up through all the adjoining provinces, even to Italy and Rome; many desiring to see who he was that could withstand so many years the Roman puissance. --Milton. [1913 Webster]

Thou hast fired me; my soul's up in arms. --Dryden. [1913 Webster]

Grief and passion are like floods raised in little brooks by a sudden rain; they are quickly up. --Dryden. [1913 Webster]

A general whisper ran among the country people, that Sir Roger was up. --Addison. [1913 Webster]

Let us, then, be up and doing, With a heart for any fate. --Longfellow. [1913 Webster] (c) To or in a position of equal advance or equality; not short of, back of, less advanced than, away from, or the like; -- usually followed by to or with; as, to be up to the chin in water; to come up with one's companions; to come up with the enemy; to live up to engagements. [1913 Webster]

As a boar was whetting his teeth, up comes a fox to him. --L'Estrange. [1913 Webster] (d) To or in a state of completion; completely; wholly; quite; as, in the phrases to eat up; to drink up; to burn up; to sum up; etc.; to shut up the eyes or the mouth; to sew up a rent. [1913 Webster]

Note: Some phrases of this kind are now obsolete; as, to spend up (--Prov. xxi. 20); to kill up (--B. Jonson). [1913 Webster] (e) Aside, so as not to be in use; as, to lay up riches; put up your weapons. [1913 Webster]

Note: Up is used elliptically for get up, rouse up, etc., expressing a command or exhortation. ``Up, and let us be going.'' --Judg. xix. 28. [1913 Webster]

Up, up, my friend! and quit your books, Or surely you 'll grow double. --Wordsworth. [1913 Webster]

{It is all up with him}, it is all over with him; he is lost.

{The time is up}, the allotted time is past.

{To be up in}, to be informed about; to be versed in. ``Anxious that their sons should be well up in the superstitions of two thousand years ago.'' --H. Spencer.

{To be up to}. (a) To be equal to, or prepared for; as, he is up to the business, or the emergency. [Colloq.] (b) To be engaged in; to purpose, with the idea of doing ill or mischief; as, I don't know what he's up to. [Colloq.]

{To blow up}. (a) To inflate; to distend. (b) To destroy by an explosion from beneath. (c) To explode; as, the boiler blew up. (d) To reprove angrily; to scold. [Slang]

{To bring up}. See under {Bring}, v. t.

{To come up with}. See under {Come}, v. i.

{To cut up}. See under {Cut}, v. t. & i.

{To draw up}. See under {Draw}, v. t.

{To grow up}, to grow to maturity.

{Up anchor} (Naut.), the order to man the windlass preparatory to hauling up the anchor.

{Up and down}. (a) First up, and then down; from one state or position to another. See under {Down}, adv.

Fortune . . . led him up and down. --Chaucer. [1913 Webster] (b) (Naut.) Vertical; perpendicular; -- said of the cable when the anchor is under, or nearly under, the hawse hole, and the cable is taut. --Totten.

{Up helm} (Naut.), the order given to move the tiller toward the upper, or windward, side of a vessel.

{Up to snuff}. See under {Snuff}. [Slang]

{What is up?} What is going on? [Slang] [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Helm up — Helm Helm, n. [OE. helme, AS. helma rudder; akin to D. & G. helm, Icel. hj[=a]lm, and perh. to E. helve.] [1913 Webster] 1. (Naut.) The apparatus by which a ship is steered, comprising rudder, tiller, wheel, etc.; commonly used of the tiller or… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Helm — Helm, n. [OE. helme, AS. helma rudder; akin to D. & G. helm, Icel. hj[=a]lm, and perh. to E. helve.] [1913 Webster] 1. (Naut.) The apparatus by which a ship is steered, comprising rudder, tiller, wheel, etc.; commonly used of the tiller or wheel… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Helm alee — Helm Helm, n. [OE. helme, AS. helma rudder; akin to D. & G. helm, Icel. hj[=a]lm, and perh. to E. helve.] [1913 Webster] 1. (Naut.) The apparatus by which a ship is steered, comprising rudder, tiller, wheel, etc.; commonly used of the tiller or… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Helm amidships — Helm Helm, n. [OE. helme, AS. helma rudder; akin to D. & G. helm, Icel. hj[=a]lm, and perh. to E. helve.] [1913 Webster] 1. (Naut.) The apparatus by which a ship is steered, comprising rudder, tiller, wheel, etc.; commonly used of the tiller or… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Helm aport — Helm Helm, n. [OE. helme, AS. helma rudder; akin to D. & G. helm, Icel. hj[=a]lm, and perh. to E. helve.] [1913 Webster] 1. (Naut.) The apparatus by which a ship is steered, comprising rudder, tiller, wheel, etc.; commonly used of the tiller or… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Helm astarboard — Helm Helm, n. [OE. helme, AS. helma rudder; akin to D. & G. helm, Icel. hj[=a]lm, and perh. to E. helve.] [1913 Webster] 1. (Naut.) The apparatus by which a ship is steered, comprising rudder, tiller, wheel, etc.; commonly used of the tiller or… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Helm aweather — Helm Helm, n. [OE. helme, AS. helma rudder; akin to D. & G. helm, Icel. hj[=a]lm, and perh. to E. helve.] [1913 Webster] 1. (Naut.) The apparatus by which a ship is steered, comprising rudder, tiller, wheel, etc.; commonly used of the tiller or… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Helm down — Helm Helm, n. [OE. helme, AS. helma rudder; akin to D. & G. helm, Icel. hj[=a]lm, and perh. to E. helve.] [1913 Webster] 1. (Naut.) The apparatus by which a ship is steered, comprising rudder, tiller, wheel, etc.; commonly used of the tiller or… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Helm hard alee — Helm Helm, n. [OE. helme, AS. helma rudder; akin to D. & G. helm, Icel. hj[=a]lm, and perh. to E. helve.] [1913 Webster] 1. (Naut.) The apparatus by which a ship is steered, comprising rudder, tiller, wheel, etc.; commonly used of the tiller or… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Helm hard aport — Helm Helm, n. [OE. helme, AS. helma rudder; akin to D. & G. helm, Icel. hj[=a]lm, and perh. to E. helve.] [1913 Webster] 1. (Naut.) The apparatus by which a ship is steered, comprising rudder, tiller, wheel, etc.; commonly used of the tiller or… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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