Unlike quantities
Unlike Un*like", a. 1. Not like; dissimilar; diverse; having no resemblance; as, the cases are unlike. [1913 Webster]

2. Not likely; improbable; unlikely. [Obsoles.] [1913 Webster]

{Unlike quantities} (Math.), quantities expressed by letters which are different or of different powers, as a, b, c, a^{2}, a^{3}, x^{n}, and the like.

{Unlike signs} (Math.), the signs plus (+) and minus (-). [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

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  • Unlike — Un*like , a. 1. Not like; dissimilar; diverse; having no resemblance; as, the cases are unlike. [1913 Webster] 2. Not likely; improbable; unlikely. [Obsoles.] [1913 Webster] {Unlike quantities} (Math.), quantities expressed by letters which are… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Unlike signs — Unlike Un*like , a. 1. Not like; dissimilar; diverse; having no resemblance; as, the cases are unlike. [1913 Webster] 2. Not likely; improbable; unlikely. [Obsoles.] [1913 Webster] {Unlike quantities} (Math.), quantities expressed by letters… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Heterogeneous quantities — Heterogeneous Het er*o*ge ne*ous, a. [Gr. ?; ? + ? race, kind; akin to E. kin: cf. F. h[ e]t[ e]rog[ e]ne.] Differing in kind; having unlike qualities; possessed of different characteristics; dissimilar; opposed to homogeneous, and said of two or …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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