Umlauted
Umlauted Um"laut*ed, a. (Philol.) Having the umlaut; as, umlauted vowels. [1913 Webster]

There is so natural connection between umlauted forms and plurality. --Earle. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

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