Tump
Tump Tump, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Tumped} (?; 215); p. pr. & vb. n. {Tumping}.] 1. To form a mass of earth or a hillock about; as, to tump teasel. [1913 Webster]

2. To draw or drag, as a deer or other animal after it has been killed. [Local, U. S.] --Bartlett. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Tump — Tump, n. [W. twmp, twm, a round mass or heap, a hillock.] A little hillock; a knoll. Ainsworth. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Tump — (perhaps akin to British dialect tumpoke to fall head over heels) is a verb used in some Southern American dialects meaning to move from a normal or upright position 1. As an intransitive verb, used with over: to tip or turn over, usually… …   Wikipedia

  • tump — tump·line; tump; …   English syllables

  • tump — [tump] n. [< ?] [Brit. Dial.] a small mound or clump …   English World dictionary

  • tump — /tump/, n. Brit. Dial. 1. a small mound, hill, or rise of ground. 2. a clump of grass, shrubs, or trees, esp. rising from a swamp or bog. 3. a heap or stack, as a haystack. [1580 90; of obscure orig.] * * * …   Universalium

  • tump — 1. noun /tʌmp/ A mound or hillock. , 1974, The island was two rocks grey as twilight between which a tump of iron loam ribbed with flint bore a stand of fir and spruce. Guy Davenport, Tatlin! 2. verb /tʌmp/ a) to bump, knock (usu. used with ove …   Wiktionary

  • tump — tip, roll, flip    Andy! Slow down, man. You gonna tump over! …   English idioms

  • tump — I. noun Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1589 1. dialect chiefly England mound, hummock 2. a clump of vegetation II. verb Etymology: perhaps akin to British dialect tumpoke to fall head over heels Date: 196 …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 'tump — Gullah Words n and v stump, stumps; stump, stumps, stumped, stumping …   English dialects glossary

  • tump — [tʌmp] noun chiefly dialect 1》 a small rounded hill. 2》 a clump of trees, shrubs, etc. Origin C16: of unknown origin …   English new terms dictionary

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