Tumbled
Tumble Tum"ble, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Tumbled}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Tumbling}.] [OE. tumblen, AS. tumbian to turn heels over head, to dance violently; akin to D. tuimelen to fall, Sw. tumla, Dan. tumle, Icel. tumba; and cf. G. taumeln to reel, to stagger.] 1. To roll over, or to and fro; to throw one's self about; as, a person on pain tumbles and tosses. [1913 Webster]

2. To roll down; to fall suddenly and violently; to be precipitated; as, to tumble from a scaffold. [1913 Webster]

He who tumbles from a tower surely has a greater blow than he who slides from a molehill. --South. [1913 Webster]

3. To play tricks by various movements and contortions of the body; to perform the feats of an acrobat. --Rowe. [1913 Webster]

{To tumble home} (Naut.), to incline inward, as the sides of a vessel, above the bends or extreme breadth; -- used esp. in the phrase tumbling home. Cf. {Wall-sided}. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • tumbled — tum·ble || tÊŒmbl n. fall, slip; disorderly state, confusion; acrobatic feat v. fall, trip, drop; roll about; topple, send tumbling; cause disorder by tossing about; perform gymnastic feats; come to understand (Informal) …   English contemporary dictionary

  • tumbled — past of tumble …   Useful english dictionary

  • The Tumbled House — is a suspense novel written by Winston Graham, who is most famous for the Poldark series of historical novels. The Tumbled House was first published in 1959 by Hodder and Stoughton and offers an insight into life in London during that… …   Wikipedia

  • leet'nd to u tumbled — Mawdesley Glossary Might have fallen …   English dialects glossary

  • tumble — /tum beuhl/, v., tumbled, tumbling, n. v.i. 1. to fall helplessly down, end over end, as by losing one s footing, support, or equilibrium; plunge headlong: to tumble down the stairs. 2. to roll end over end, as in falling: The stones tumbled down …   Universalium

  • tumble — tum|ble1 [ˈtʌmbəl] v [Date: 1200 1300; Origin: tumb [i] to dance, perform as a tumbler (11 14 centuries), from Old English tumbian] 1.) [always + adverb/preposition] to fall down quickly and suddenly, especially with a rolling movement tumble… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • tum|ble — «TUHM buhl», verb, bled, bling, noun. –v.i. 1. to fall headlong or in a helpless way, as from stumbling or violence; be precipitated: »The child tumbled down the stairs. 2. to fall prone; fall (down) to the ground. 3. to stumble by tripping (over …   Useful english dictionary

  • tumble — tum|ble1 [ tʌmbl ] verb intransitive 1. ) if a price or value tumbles, it suddenly becomes much lower: Unemployment tumbled to 5.6% in November. 2. ) if a building or other structure tumbles or tumbles down, it falls to the ground: It seemed that …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • tumble — [[t]tʌ̱mb(ə)l[/t]] tumbles, tumbling, tumbled 1) VERB If someone or something tumbles somewhere, they fall there with a rolling or bouncing movement. [V prep/adv] A small boy tumbled off a third floor fire escape... [V prep/adv] The dog had… …   English dictionary

  • tumble — 1 verb (I) 1 (always + adv/prep) to fall quickly and suddenly downwards, especially with a rolling movement (+ over/backwards/down): She lost her balance and tumbled backwards. 2 (always + adv/prep) to move in an uncontrolled way (+ into/through) …   Longman dictionary of contemporary English

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