Trite Trite (tr[imac]t), a. [L. tritus, p. p. of terere to rub, to wear out; probably akin to E. throw. See {Throw}, and cf. {Contrite}, {Detriment}, {Tribulation}, {Try}.] Worn out; common; used until so common as to have lost novelty and interest; hackneyed; stale; as, a trite remark; a trite subject. -- {Trite"ly}, adv. -- {Trite"ness}, n. [1913 Webster]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • tritely — trite ► ADJECTIVE ▪ (of a remark or idea) lacking originality or freshness; dull on account of overuse. DERIVATIVES tritely adverb triteness noun. ORIGIN Latin tritus rubbed …   English terms dictionary

  • tritely — adverb in a trite manner tritely expressed emotions • Derived from adjective: ↑trite …   Useful english dictionary

  • tritely — adverb see trite …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • tritely — See trite. * * * …   Universalium

  • tritely — adverb In a trite manner …   Wiktionary

  • tritely — adv. in an unoriginal manner, in a stale manner …   English contemporary dictionary

  • tritely — trite·ly …   English syllables

  • trite — tritely, adv. triteness, n. /truyt/, adj., triter, tritest. 1. lacking in freshness or effectiveness because of constant use or excessive repetition; hackneyed; stale: the trite phrases in his letter. 2. characterized by hackneyed expressions,… …   Universalium

  • trite — [traıt] adj [Date: 1500 1600; : Latin; Origin: tritus, past participle of terere to rub, wear out ] a trite remark, idea etc is boring, not new, and insincere ▪ Her remarks sounded trite and ill informed. >triteness n [U] >tritely adv ▪… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • trite — adjective (triter; tritest) Etymology: Latin tritus, from past participle of terere to rub, wear away more at throw Date: 1548 hackneyed or boring from much use ; not fresh or original • tritely adverb • triteness noun Synonyms …   New Collegiate Dictionary

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