Trench Trench, n. [OE. trenche, F. tranch['e]e. See {Trench}, v. t.] 1. A long, narrow cut in the earth; a ditch; as, a trench for draining land. --Mortimer. [1913 Webster]

2. An alley; a narrow path or walk cut through woods, shrubbery, or the like. [Obs.] [1913 Webster]

In a trench, forth in the park, goeth she. --Chaucer. [1913 Webster]

3. (Fort.) An excavation made during a siege, for the purpose of covering the troops as they advance toward the besieged place. The term includes the parallels and the approaches. [1913 Webster]

{To open the trenches} (Mil.), to begin to dig or to form the lines of approach.

{Trench cavalier} (Fort.), an elevation constructed (by a besieger) of gabions, fascines, earth, and the like, about half way up the glacis, in order to discover and enfilade the covered way.

{Trench plow}, or {Trench plough}, a kind of plow for opening land to a greater depth than that of common furrows. [1913 Webster]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.


Look at other dictionaries:

  • Trench — coat Un trench coat est un manteau imperméable généralement descendant jusqu aux mollets, utilisé par plusieurs armées pendant la Première Guerre mondiale et la Seconde Guerre mondiale. Les trench coats sont désormais fabriqués dans une toile… …   Wikipédia en Français

  • trench — /trench/, n. 1. Fort. a long, narrow excavation in the ground, the earth from which is thrown up in front to serve as a shelter from enemy fire or attack. 2. trenches, a system of such excavations, with their embankments, etc. 3. a deep furrow,… …   Universalium

  • Trench — /trench/, n. Richard Chenevix /shen euh vee/, 1807 86, English clergyman and scholar, born in Ireland. * * * (as used in expressions) deep sea trench oceanic trench Mariana Trench trench warfare * * * …   Universalium

  • Trench — Trench, v. i. 1. To encroach; to intrench. [1913 Webster] Does it not seem as if for a creature to challenge to itself a boundless attribute, were to trench upon the prerogative of the divine nature? I. Taylor. [1913 Webster] 2. To have… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Trench — Trench, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Trenched}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Trenching}.] [OF. trenchier to cut, F. trancher; akin to Pr. trencar, trenchar, Sp. trinchar, It. trinciare; of uncertain origin.] 1. To cut; to form or shape by cutting; to make by… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • trench — s.m.inv. ES ingl. {{wmetafile0}} TS abbigl. impermeabile di taglio sportivo e con cintura in vita, indossato in origine dagli ufficiali inglesi durante la prima guerra mondiale Sinonimi: trench coat. {{line}} {{/line}} DATA: 1933. ETIMO: propr.… …   Dizionario italiano

  • trench — [trentʃ] n [Date: 1300 1400; : Old French; Origin: trenche act of cutting , from trenchier to cut , probably from Latin truncare; TRUNCATE] 1.) a long narrow hole dug into the surface of the ground ▪ Workers dug a trench for gas lines. 2.) …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • trench — (n.) late 14c., track cut through a wood, later long, narrow ditch (late 15c.), from O.Fr. trenche a slice, ditch (late 13c.), from trenchier to cut, possibly from V.L. *trincare, from L. truncare to cut or lop off (see TRUNCATE (Cf. truncate)).… …   Etymology dictionary

  • trench — /ingl. trɛntʃ/ [vc. ingl., riduzione di trench coat «impermeabile militare», letteralmente «soprabito (coat) da trincea (trench)»] s. m. inv. impermeabile, soprabito …   Sinonimi e Contrari. Terza edizione

  • trench — ► NOUN 1) a long, narrow ditch. 2) a ditch dug by troops to provide shelter from enemy fire. 3) (also ocean trench) a long, narrow, deep depression in the ocean bed. ► VERB ▪ dig a trench or trenches in. ORIGIN Old French trenche, from Latin… …   English terms dictionary

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