Tregetour
Tregetour Treg"et*our, n. [OE. tresgeteor. See {Trans-}, and {Jet} a shooting forth.] A juggler who produces illusions by the use of elaborate machinery. [Obs.] [1913 Webster]

Divers appearances Such as these subtle tregetours play. --Chaucer. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • tregetour — noun /ˈtrɛʤətə/ A magician or juggler; a trickster. , Late C14: men make diverse apparences, / Swiche as thise subtile tregetoures pleye. Geoffrey Chaucer, ‘The Franklins Tale’, Canterbury Tales …   Wiktionary

  • tregetour — treg·et·our …   English syllables

  • tregetour — A street magician or juggler …   Grandiloquent dictionary

  • tregetour — ˈtrejəd.ə(r) noun ( s) Etymology: Middle English, from Old French tresgeteor, from tresgeter to throw across, juggle (from tres across from Latin trans + geter, jeter to throw, from Latin jactare) + eor or more at …   Useful english dictionary

  • Trajet — Tra jet, Trajetour Tra jet*our, Trajetry Tra jet*ry, n. See {Treget}, {Tregetour}, and {Tregetry}. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Trajetour — Trajet Tra jet, Trajetour Tra jet*our, Trajetry Tra jet*ry, n. See {Treget}, {Tregetour}, and {Tregetry}. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Trajetry — Trajet Tra jet, Trajetour Tra jet*our, Trajetry Tra jet*ry, n. See {Treget}, {Tregetour}, and {Tregetry}. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Treget — Treg et, n. [See {Tregetour}.] Guile; trickery. [Obs.] Rom. of R. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • mummery — noun a) merrymaking; the performance of a mummer I say the sewer thought I was dressed to bear a part in the tregetour’s mummery, and so I got admission b) a ridiculous or ostentatious ceremony, especially of a religious nature Why, you unweaned… …   Wiktionary

  • Tredget — This interesting surname, dating from the late 12th Century, derives from the old French word tresgiet or treget , and the middle English treget or trigit , which could mean a juggler , but at this period is more likely to describe people who… …   Surnames reference

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