Trajectory Tra*ject"o*ry, n.; pl. {Trajectories}. [Cf. F. trajectoire.] The curve which a body describes in space, as a planet or comet in its orbit, or stone thrown upward obliquely in the air. [1913 Webster]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

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  • Trajectory — is the path a moving object follows through space. The object might be a projectile or a satellite, for example. It thus includes the meaning of orbit the path of a planet, an asteroid or a comet as it travels around a central mass. A trajectory… …   Wikipedia

  • trajectory — (n.) 1690s, from Mod.L. trajectoria, from fem. of trajectorius of or pertaining to throwing across, from L. traiectus thrown over or across, pp. of traicere throw across, from L. trans across (see TRANS (Cf. trans )) + icere, combining form of… …   Etymology dictionary

  • trajectory — [n] course curve, direction, flight, flow, line, movement, orbit, path, range, route, track, trail; concepts 501,514 …   New thesaurus

  • trajectory — ► NOUN (pl. trajectories) ▪ the path described by a projectile flying or an object moving under the action of given forces. ORIGIN Latin trajectoria, from traicere throw across …   English terms dictionary

  • trajectory — [trə jek′tə rē] n. pl. trajectories [ML trajectorius < L trajectus: see TRAJECT] 1. the curved path of something hurtling through space, esp. that of a projectile from the time it leaves the muzzle of the gun 2. Math. a) a curve or surface… …   English World dictionary

  • trajectory — [[t]trəʤe̱ktəri[/t]] trajectories 1) N COUNT: with supp The trajectory of a moving object is the path that it follows as it moves. ...the trajectory of an artillery shell. 2) N COUNT: with supp The trajectory of something such as a person s… …   English dictionary

  • trajectory — UK [trəˈdʒekt(ə)rɪ] / US [trəˈdʒektərɪ] noun [countable] Word forms trajectory : singular trajectory plural trajectories 1) the high curving line in which an object such as a missile moves through the air The bomb followed a high trajectory… …   English dictionary

  • trajectory — noun (plural ries) Etymology: New Latin trajectoria, from feminine of trajectorius of passing, from Latin traicere to cause to cross, cross, from trans , tra trans + jacere to throw more at jet Date: 1696 1. the curve that a body (as a planet or… …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • trajectory — tra|jec|to|ry [ trə dʒektəri ] noun count 1. ) TECHNICAL the high curving line in which an object such as a missile moves through the air: The bomb followed a high trajectory toward its target. 2. ) FORMAL the way in which a process or event… …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • trajectory — See ballistic trajectory …   Military dictionary

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