To wing a flight
Wing Wing, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Winged}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Winging}.] 1. To furnish with wings; to enable to fly, or to move with celerity. [1913 Webster]

Who heaves old ocean, and whowings the storms. --Pope. [1913 Webster]

Living, to wing with mirth the weary hours. --Longfellow. [1913 Webster]

2. To supply with wings or sidepieces. [1913 Webster]

The main battle, whose puissance on either side Shall be well winged with our chiefest horse. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

3. To transport by flight; to cause to fly. [1913 Webster]

I, an old turtle, Will wing me to some withered bough. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

4. To move through in flight; to fly through. [1913 Webster]

There's not an arrow wings the sky But fancy turns its point to him. --Moore. [1913 Webster]

5. To cut off the wings of or to wound in the wing; to disable a wing of; as, to wing a bird; also, [fig.] to wound the arm of a person. [1913 Webster +PJC]

{To wing a flight}, to exert the power of flying; to fly. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • to take a flight9 — Flight Flight (fl[imac]t), n. [AS. fliht, flyht, a flying, fr. fle[ o]gan to fly; cf. flyht a fleeing, fr. fle[ o]n to flee, G. flucht a fleeing, Sw. flykt, G. flug a flying, Sw. flygt, D. vlugt a fleeing or flying, Dan. flugt. [root]84. See… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • AmeriPlanes Mitchell Wing A-10 — Mitchell Wing A 10 A 10 Role Ultralight aircraft National origin …   Wikipedia

  • Wing — Wing, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Winged}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Winging}.] 1. To furnish with wings; to enable to fly, or to move with celerity. [1913 Webster] Who heaves old ocean, and whowings the storms. Pope. [1913 Webster] Living, to wing with mirth… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • wing — /wing/, n. 1. either of the two forelimbs of most birds and of bats, corresponding to the human arms, that are specialized for flight. 2. either of two corresponding parts in flightless birds, which may be rudimentary, as in certain ratite birds …   Universalium

  • Flight — (fl[imac]t), n. [AS. fliht, flyht, a flying, fr. fle[ o]gan to fly; cf. flyht a fleeing, fr. fle[ o]n to flee, G. flucht a fleeing, Sw. flykt, G. flug a flying, Sw. flygt, D. vlugt a fleeing or flying, Dan. flugt. [root]84. See {Flee}, {Fly}.] 1 …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Flight feathers — Flight Flight (fl[imac]t), n. [AS. fliht, flyht, a flying, fr. fle[ o]gan to fly; cf. flyht a fleeing, fr. fle[ o]n to flee, G. flucht a fleeing, Sw. flykt, G. flug a flying, Sw. flygt, D. vlugt a fleeing or flying, Dan. flugt. [root]84. See… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To put to flight — Flight Flight (fl[imac]t), n. [AS. fliht, flyht, a flying, fr. fle[ o]gan to fly; cf. flyht a fleeing, fr. fle[ o]n to flee, G. flucht a fleeing, Sw. flykt, G. flug a flying, Sw. flygt, D. vlugt a fleeing or flying, Dan. flugt. [root]84. See… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To turn to flight — Flight Flight (fl[imac]t), n. [AS. fliht, flyht, a flying, fr. fle[ o]gan to fly; cf. flyht a fleeing, fr. fle[ o]n to flee, G. flucht a fleeing, Sw. flykt, G. flug a flying, Sw. flygt, D. vlugt a fleeing or flying, Dan. flugt. [root]84. See… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • wing — [[t]wɪŋ[/t]] n. 1) orn either of the two forelimbs of birds and some mammals, corresponding to the human arms, that are specialized for flight or may be rudimentary, as in flightless birds, and sometimes adapted for swimming, as in penguins 2)… …   From formal English to slang

  • flight — noun 1 trip by air; plane making a flight ADJECTIVE ▪ round trip (AmE) ▪ The first prize is a round trip flight to Rio. ▪ inbound, return ▪ The return flight was held up by six hours …   Collocations dictionary

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