To wind out
Wind Wind, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Wound} (wound) (rarely {Winded}); p. pr. & vb. n. {Winding}.] [OE. winden, AS. windan; akin to OS. windan, D. & G. winden, OHG. wintan, Icel. & Sw. vinda, Dan. vinde, Goth. windan (in comp.). Cf. {Wander}, {Wend}.] [1913 Webster] 1. To turn completely, or with repeated turns; especially, to turn about something fixed; to cause to form convolutions about anything; to coil; to twine; to twist; to wreathe; as, to wind thread on a spool or into a ball. [1913 Webster]

Whether to wind The woodbine round this arbor. --Milton. [1913 Webster]

2. To entwist; to infold; to encircle. [1913 Webster]

Sleep, and I will wind thee in arms. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

3. To have complete control over; to turn and bend at one's pleasure; to vary or alter or will; to regulate; to govern. ``To turn and wind a fiery Pegasus.'' --Shak. [1913 Webster]

In his terms so he would him wind. --Chaucer. [1913 Webster]

Gifts blind the wise, and bribes do please And wind all other witnesses. --Herrick. [1913 Webster]

Were our legislature vested in the prince, he might wind and turn our constitution at his pleasure. --Addison. [1913 Webster]

4. To introduce by insinuation; to insinuate. [1913 Webster]

You have contrived . . . to wind Yourself into a power tyrannical. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

Little arts and dexterities they have to wind in such things into discourse. --Gov. of Tongue. [1913 Webster]

5. To cover or surround with something coiled about; as, to wind a rope with twine. [1913 Webster]

{To wind off}, to unwind; to uncoil.

{To wind out}, to extricate. [Obs.] --Clarendon.

{To wind up}. (a) To coil into a ball or small compass, as a skein of thread; to coil completely. (b) To bring to a conclusion or settlement; as, to wind up one's affairs; to wind up an argument. (c) To put in a state of renewed or continued motion, as a clock, a watch, etc., by winding the spring, or that which carries the weight; hence, to prepare for continued movement or action; to put in order anew. ``Fate seemed to wind him up for fourscore years.'' --Dryden. ``Thus they wound up his temper to a pitch.'' --Atterbury. (d) To tighten (the strings) of a musical instrument, so as to tune it. ``Wind up the slackened strings of thy lute.'' --Waller. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • To come out — Out Out (out), adv. [OE. out, ut, oute, ute, AS. [=u]t, and [=u]te, [=u]tan, fr. [=u]t; akin to D. uit, OS. [=u]t, G. aus, OHG. [=u]z, Icel. [=u]t, Sw. ut, Dan. ud, Goth. ut, Skr. ud. [root]198. Cf. {About}, {But}, prep., {Carouse}, {Utter}, a.]… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To cut out — Out Out (out), adv. [OE. out, ut, oute, ute, AS. [=u]t, and [=u]te, [=u]tan, fr. [=u]t; akin to D. uit, OS. [=u]t, G. aus, OHG. [=u]z, Icel. [=u]t, Sw. ut, Dan. ud, Goth. ut, Skr. ud. [root]198. Cf. {About}, {But}, prep., {Carouse}, {Utter}, a.]… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To fall out — Out Out (out), adv. [OE. out, ut, oute, ute, AS. [=u]t, and [=u]te, [=u]tan, fr. [=u]t; akin to D. uit, OS. [=u]t, G. aus, OHG. [=u]z, Icel. [=u]t, Sw. ut, Dan. ud, Goth. ut, Skr. ud. [root]198. Cf. {About}, {But}, prep., {Carouse}, {Utter}, a.]… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To make out — Out Out (out), adv. [OE. out, ut, oute, ute, AS. [=u]t, and [=u]te, [=u]tan, fr. [=u]t; akin to D. uit, OS. [=u]t, G. aus, OHG. [=u]z, Icel. [=u]t, Sw. ut, Dan. ud, Goth. ut, Skr. ud. [root]198. Cf. {About}, {But}, prep., {Carouse}, {Utter}, a.]… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To come out — Come Come, v. i. [imp. {Came}; p. p. {Come}; p. pr & vb. n. {Coming}.] [OE. cumen, comen, AS. cuman; akin to OS.kuman, D. komen, OHG. queman, G. kommen, Icel. koma, Sw. komma, Dan. komme, Goth. giman, L. venire (gvenire), Gr. ? to go, Skr. gam.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To blow out — Blow Blow, v. i. [imp. {Blew} (bl[=u]); p. p. {Blown} (bl[=o]n); p. pr. & vb. n. {Blowing}.] [OE. blawen, blowen, AS. bl[=a]wan to blow, as wind; akin to OHG. pl[=a]jan, G. bl[ a]hen, to blow up, swell, L. flare to blow, Gr. ekflai nein to spout… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To break out — Break Break (br[=a]k), v. t. [imp. {broke} (br[=o]k), (Obs. {Brake}); p. p. {Broken} (br[=o] k n), (Obs. {Broke}); p. pr. & vb. n. {Breaking}.] [OE. breken, AS. brecan; akin to OS. brekan, D. breken, OHG. brehhan, G. brechen, Icel. braka to creak …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To back out — Back Back, v. i. 1. To move or go backward; as, the horse refuses to back. [1913 Webster] 2. (Naut.) To change from one quarter to another by a course opposite to that of the sun; used of the wind. [1913 Webster] 3. (Sporting) To stand still… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To fly out — Fly Fly (fl[imac]), v. i. [imp. {Flew} (fl[=u]); p. p. {Flown} (fl[=o]n); p. pr. & vb. n. {Flying}.] [OE. fleen, fleen, fleyen, flegen, AS. fle[ o]gan; akin to D. vliegen, OHG. fliogan, G. fliegen, Icel. flj[=u]ga, Sw. flyga, Dan. flyve, Goth. us …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To blow out — Blow Blow, v. t. 1. To force a current of air upon with the mouth, or by other means; as, to blow the fire. [1913 Webster] 2. To drive by a current air; to impel; as, the tempest blew the ship ashore. [1913 Webster] Off at sea northeast winds… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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