To wear upon
Wear Wear, v. t. [imp. {Wore} (w[=o]r); p. p. {Worn} (w[=o]rn); p. pr. & vb. n. {Wearing}. Before the 15th century wear was a weak verb, the imp. & p. p. being {Weared}.] [OE. weren, werien, AS. werian to carry, to wear, as arms or clothes; akin to OHG. werien, weren, to clothe, Goth. wasjan, L. vestis clothing, vestire to clothe, Gr. "enny`nai, Skr. vas. Cf. {Vest}.] [1913 Webster] 1. To carry or bear upon the person; to bear upon one's self, as an article of clothing, decoration, warfare, bondage, etc.; to have appendant to one's body; to have on; as, to wear a coat; to wear a shackle. [1913 Webster]

What compass will you wear your farthingale? --Shak. [1913 Webster]

On her white breast a sparkling cross she wore, Which Jews might kiss, and infidels adore. --Pope. [1913 Webster]

2. To have or exhibit an appearance of, as an aspect or manner; to bear; as, she wears a smile on her countenance. ``He wears the rose of youth upon him.'' --Shak. [1913 Webster]

His innocent gestures wear A meaning half divine. --Keble. [1913 Webster]

3. To use up by carrying or having upon one's self; hence, to consume by use; to waste; to use up; as, to wear clothes rapidly. [1913 Webster]

4. To impair, waste, or diminish, by continual attrition, scraping, percussion, on the like; to consume gradually; to cause to lower or disappear; to spend. [1913 Webster]

That wicked wight his days doth wear. --Spenser. [1913 Webster]

The waters wear the stones. --Job xiv. 19. [1913 Webster]

5. To cause or make by friction or wasting; as, to wear a channel; to wear a hole. [1913 Webster]

6. To form or shape by, or as by, attrition. [1913 Webster]

Trials wear us into a liking of what, possibly, in the first essay, displeased us. --Locke. [1913 Webster]

{To wear away}, to consume; to impair, diminish, or destroy, by gradual attrition or decay.

{To wear off}, to diminish or remove by attrition or slow decay; as, to wear off the nap of cloth.

{To wear on} or {To wear upon}, to wear. [Obs.] ``[I] weared upon my gay scarlet gites [gowns.]'' --Chaucer.

{To wear out}. (a) To consume, or render useless, by attrition or decay; as, to wear out a coat or a book. (b) To consume tediously. ``To wear out miserable days.'' --Milton. (c) To harass; to tire. ``[He] shall wear out the saints of the Most High.'' --Dan vii. 25. (d) To waste the strength of; as, an old man worn out in military service.

{To wear the breeches}. See under {Breeches}. [Colloq.] [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • To go upon — Go Go, v. i. [imp. {Went} (w[e^]nt); p. p. {Gone} (g[o^]n; 115); p. pr. & vb. n. {Going}. Went comes from the AS, wendan. See {Wend}, v. i.] [OE. gan, gon, AS. g[=a]n, akin to D. gaan, G. gehn, gehen, OHG. g[=e]n, g[=a]n, SW. g[*a], Dan. gaae; cf …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To prey upon — Prey Prey, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Preyed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Preying}.] [OF. preier, preer, L. praedari, fr. praeda. See {Prey}, n.] To take booty; to gather spoil; to ravage; to take food by violence. [1913 Webster] More pity that the eagle should… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To wear away — Wear Wear, v. t. [imp. {Wore} (w[=o]r); p. p. {Worn} (w[=o]rn); p. pr. & vb. n. {Wearing}. Before the 15th century wear was a weak verb, the imp. & p. p. being {Weared}.] [OE. weren, werien, AS. werian to carry, to wear, as arms or clothes; akin… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To wear off — Wear Wear, v. t. [imp. {Wore} (w[=o]r); p. p. {Worn} (w[=o]rn); p. pr. & vb. n. {Wearing}. Before the 15th century wear was a weak verb, the imp. & p. p. being {Weared}.] [OE. weren, werien, AS. werian to carry, to wear, as arms or clothes; akin… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To wear on — Wear Wear, v. t. [imp. {Wore} (w[=o]r); p. p. {Worn} (w[=o]rn); p. pr. & vb. n. {Wearing}. Before the 15th century wear was a weak verb, the imp. & p. p. being {Weared}.] [OE. weren, werien, AS. werian to carry, to wear, as arms or clothes; akin… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To wear out — Wear Wear, v. t. [imp. {Wore} (w[=o]r); p. p. {Worn} (w[=o]rn); p. pr. & vb. n. {Wearing}. Before the 15th century wear was a weak verb, the imp. & p. p. being {Weared}.] [OE. weren, werien, AS. werian to carry, to wear, as arms or clothes; akin… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To wear the breeches — Wear Wear, v. t. [imp. {Wore} (w[=o]r); p. p. {Worn} (w[=o]rn); p. pr. & vb. n. {Wearing}. Before the 15th century wear was a weak verb, the imp. & p. p. being {Weared}.] [OE. weren, werien, AS. werian to carry, to wear, as arms or clothes; akin… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To wear one's heart upon one's sleeve — Heart Heart (h[aum]rt), n. [OE. harte, herte, heorte, AS. heorte; akin to OS. herta, OFies. hirte, D. hart, OHG. herza, G. herz, Icel. hjarta, Sw. hjerta, Goth. ha[ i]rt[=o], Lith. szirdis, Russ. serdtse, Ir. cridhe, L. cor, Gr. kardi a, kh^r.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To wear the breeches — Breeches Breech es (br[i^]ch [e^]z), n. pl. [OE. brech, brek, AS. br[=e]k, pl. of br[=o]c breech, breeches; akin to Icel. br[=o]k breeches, ODan. brog, D. broek, G. bruch; cf. L. bracae, braccae, which is of Celtic origin. Cf. {Brail}.] 1. A… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To run upon sorts — Sort Sort, n. [F. sorie (cf. It. sorta, sorte), from L. sors, sorti, a lot, part, probably akin to serere to connect. See {Series}, and cf. {Assort}, {Consort}, {Resort}, {Sorcery}, {Sort} lot.] 1. A kind or species; any number or collection of… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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