To wear off
Wear Wear, v. i. 1. To endure or suffer use; to last under employment; to bear the consequences of use, as waste, consumption, or attrition; as, a coat wears well or ill; -- hence, sometimes applied to character, qualifications, etc.; as, a man wears well as an acquaintance. [1913 Webster]

2. To be wasted, consumed, or diminished, by being used; to suffer injury, loss, or extinction by use or time; to decay, or be spent, gradually. ``Thus wore out night.'' --Milton. [1913 Webster]

Away, I say; time wears. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

Thou wilt surely wear away, both thou and this people that is with thee. --Ex. xviii. 18. [1913 Webster]

His stock of money began to wear very low. --Sir W. Scott. [1913 Webster]

The family . . . wore out in the earlier part of the century. --Beaconsfield. [1913 Webster]

{To wear off}, to pass away by degrees; as, the follies of youth wear off with age.

{To wear on}, to pass on; as, time wears on. --G. Eliot.

{To wear weary}, to become weary, as by wear, long occupation, tedious employment, etc. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • To wear off — Wear Wear, v. t. [imp. {Wore} (w[=o]r); p. p. {Worn} (w[=o]rn); p. pr. & vb. n. {Wearing}. Before the 15th century wear was a weak verb, the imp. & p. p. being {Weared}.] [OE. weren, werien, AS. werian to carry, to wear, as arms or clothes; akin… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To polish off — Polish Pol ish, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Polished}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Polishing}.] [F. polir, L. polire. Cf. {Polite}, { ish}] 1. To make smooth and glossy, usually by friction; to burnish; to overspread with luster; as, to polish glass, marble,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To bear off — Bear Bear (b[^a]r), v. t. [imp. {Bore} (b[=o]r) (formerly {Bare} (b[^a]r)); p. p. {Born} (b[^o]rn), {Borne} (b[=o]rn); p. pr. & vb. n. {Bearing}.] [OE. beren, AS. beran, beoran, to bear, carry, produce; akin to D. baren to bring forth, G. geb[… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To go off — Go Go, v. i. [imp. {Went} (w[e^]nt); p. p. {Gone} (g[o^]n; 115); p. pr. & vb. n. {Going}. Went comes from the AS, wendan. See {Wend}, v. i.] [OE. gan, gon, AS. g[=a]n, akin to D. gaan, G. gehn, gehen, OHG. g[=e]n, g[=a]n, SW. g[*a], Dan. gaae; cf …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To ease off — Ease Ease ([=e]z), v. t. & i. [imp. & p. p. {Eased} ([=e]zd); p. pr. & vb. n. {Easing}.] [OE. esen, eisen, OF. aisier. See {Ease}, n.] 1. To free from anything that pains, disquiets, or oppresses; to relieve from toil or care; to give rest,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To wear away — Wear Wear, v. t. [imp. {Wore} (w[=o]r); p. p. {Worn} (w[=o]rn); p. pr. & vb. n. {Wearing}. Before the 15th century wear was a weak verb, the imp. & p. p. being {Weared}.] [OE. weren, werien, AS. werian to carry, to wear, as arms or clothes; akin… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To wear on — Wear Wear, v. t. [imp. {Wore} (w[=o]r); p. p. {Worn} (w[=o]rn); p. pr. & vb. n. {Wearing}. Before the 15th century wear was a weak verb, the imp. & p. p. being {Weared}.] [OE. weren, werien, AS. werian to carry, to wear, as arms or clothes; akin… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To wear out — Wear Wear, v. t. [imp. {Wore} (w[=o]r); p. p. {Worn} (w[=o]rn); p. pr. & vb. n. {Wearing}. Before the 15th century wear was a weak verb, the imp. & p. p. being {Weared}.] [OE. weren, werien, AS. werian to carry, to wear, as arms or clothes; akin… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To wear the breeches — Wear Wear, v. t. [imp. {Wore} (w[=o]r); p. p. {Worn} (w[=o]rn); p. pr. & vb. n. {Wearing}. Before the 15th century wear was a weak verb, the imp. & p. p. being {Weared}.] [OE. weren, werien, AS. werian to carry, to wear, as arms or clothes; akin… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To wear upon — Wear Wear, v. t. [imp. {Wore} (w[=o]r); p. p. {Worn} (w[=o]rn); p. pr. & vb. n. {Wearing}. Before the 15th century wear was a weak verb, the imp. & p. p. being {Weared}.] [OE. weren, werien, AS. werian to carry, to wear, as arms or clothes; akin… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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