To trust on
Trust Trust, v. i. 1. To have trust; to be credulous; to be won to confidence; to confide. [1913 Webster]

More to know could not be more to trust. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

2. To be confident, as of something future; to hope. [1913 Webster]

I will trust and not be afraid. --Isa. xii. 2. [1913 Webster]

3. To sell or deliver anything in reliance upon a promise of payment; to give credit. [1913 Webster]

It is happier sometimes to be cheated than not to trust. --Johnson. [1913 Webster]

{To trust in}, {To trust on}, to place confidence in,; to rely on; to depend. ``Trust in the Lord, and do good.'' --Ps. xxxvii. 3. ``A priest . . . on whom we trust.'' --Chaucer. [1913 Webster]

Her widening streets on new foundations trust. --Dryden. [1913 Webster]

{To trust to} or {To trust unto}, to depend on; to have confidence in; to rely on; as, to trust to luck. [1913 Webster]

They trusted unto the liers in wait. --Judges xx. 36. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • To put on — Put Put, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Put}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Putting}.] [AS. potian to thrust: cf. Dan. putte to put, to put into, Fries. putje; perh. akin to W. pwtio to butt, poke, thrust; cf. also Gael. put to push, thrust, and E. potter, v. i.] 1. To …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To run on — Run Run, v. i. [imp. {Ran}or {Run}; p. p. {Run}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Running}.] [OE. rinnen, rennen (imp. ran, p. p. runnen, ronnen). AS. rinnan to flow (imp. ran, p. p. gerunnen), and iernan, irnan, to run (imp. orn, arn, earn, p. p. urnen); akin… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To bring on — Bring Bring, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Brought}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Bringing}.] [OE. bringen, AS. bringan; akin to OS. brengian, D. brengen, Fries. brenga, OHG. bringan, G. bringen, Goth. briggan.] 1. To convey to the place where the speaker is or is to …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To believe on — Believe Be*lieve , v. i. 1. To have a firm persuasion, esp. of the truths of religion; to have a persuasion approaching to certainty; to exercise belief or faith. [1913 Webster] Lord, I believe; help thou mine unbelief. Mark ix. 24. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To trust in — Trust Trust, v. i. 1. To have trust; to be credulous; to be won to confidence; to confide. [1913 Webster] More to know could not be more to trust. Shak. [1913 Webster] 2. To be confident, as of something future; to hope. [1913 Webster] I will… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To trust to — Trust Trust, v. i. 1. To have trust; to be credulous; to be won to confidence; to confide. [1913 Webster] More to know could not be more to trust. Shak. [1913 Webster] 2. To be confident, as of something future; to hope. [1913 Webster] I will… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To trust unto — Trust Trust, v. i. 1. To have trust; to be credulous; to be won to confidence; to confide. [1913 Webster] More to know could not be more to trust. Shak. [1913 Webster] 2. To be confident, as of something future; to hope. [1913 Webster] I will… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To enter on the boards — Board Board (b[=o]rd), n. [OE. bord, AS. bord board, shipboard; akin to bred plank, Icel. bor[eth] board, side of a ship, Goth. f[=o]tu baurd footstool, D. bord board, G. brett, bort. See def. 8. [root]92.] 1. A piece of timber sawed thin, and of …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Trust — Trust, v. i. 1. To have trust; to be credulous; to be won to confidence; to confide. [1913 Webster] More to know could not be more to trust. Shak. [1913 Webster] 2. To be confident, as of something future; to hope. [1913 Webster] I will trust and …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Trust (social sciences) — Trust is a relationship of reliance. A trusted party is presumed to seek to fulfill policies, ethical codes, law and their previous promises.Trust does not need to involve belief in the good character, vices, or morals of the other party. Persons …   Wikipedia

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”