To train up
Train Train, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Trained}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Training}.] [OF. trahiner, tra["i]ner,F. tra[^i]ner, LL. trahinare, trainare, fr. L. trahere to draw. See {Trail}.] [1913 Webster] 1. To draw along; to trail; to drag. [1913 Webster]

In hollow cube Training his devilish enginery. --Milton. [1913 Webster]

2. To draw by persuasion, artifice, or the like; to attract by stratagem; to entice; to allure. [Obs.] [1913 Webster]

If but a dozen French Were there in arms, they would be as a call To train ten thousand English to their side. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

O, train me not, sweet mermaid, with thy note. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

This feast, I'll gage my life, Is but a plot to train you to your ruin. --Ford. [1913 Webster]

3. To teach and form by practice; to educate; to exercise; to discipline; as, to train the militia to the manual exercise; to train soldiers to the use of arms. [1913 Webster]

Our trained bands, which are the trustiest and most proper strength of a free nation. --Milton. [1913 Webster]

The warrior horse here bred he's taught to train. --Dryden. [1913 Webster]

4. To break, tame, and accustom to draw, as oxen. [1913 Webster]

5. (Hort.) To lead or direct, and form to a wall or espalier; to form to a proper shape, by bending, lopping, or pruning; as, to train young trees. [1913 Webster]

He trained the young branches to the right hand or to the left. --Jeffrey. [1913 Webster]

6. (Mining) To trace, as a lode or any mineral appearance, to its head. [1913 Webster]

{To train a gun} (Mil. & Naut.), to point it at some object either forward or else abaft the beam, that is, not directly on the side. --Totten.

{To train}, or {To train up}, to educate; to teach; to form by instruction or practice; to bring up. [1913 Webster]

Train up a child in the way he should go; and when he is old, he will not depart from it. --Prov. xxii. 6. [1913 Webster]

The first Christians were, by great hardships, trained up for glory. --Tillotson. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • To take up — Take Take, v. t. [imp. {Took} (t[oo^]k); p. p. {Taken} (t[=a]k n); p. pr. & vb. n. {Taking}.] [Icel. taka; akin to Sw. taga, Dan. tage, Goth. t[=e]kan to touch; of uncertain origin.] 1. In an active sense; To lay hold of; to seize with the hands …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To break up — Break Break (br[=a]k), v. t. [imp. {broke} (br[=o]k), (Obs. {Brake}); p. p. {Broken} (br[=o] k n), (Obs. {Broke}); p. pr. & vb. n. {Breaking}.] [OE. breken, AS. brecan; akin to OS. brekan, D. breken, OHG. brehhan, G. brechen, Icel. braka to creak …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To cut up — Cut Cut (k[u^]t), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Cut}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Cutting}.] [OE. cutten, kitten, ketten; prob. of Celtic origin; cf. W. cwtau to shorten, curtail, dock, cwta bobtailed, cwt tail, skirt, Gael. cutaich to shorten, curtail, dock, cutach …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To run up — Run Run, v. i. [imp. {Ran}or {Run}; p. p. {Run}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Running}.] [OE. rinnen, rennen (imp. ran, p. p. runnen, ronnen). AS. rinnan to flow (imp. ran, p. p. gerunnen), and iernan, irnan, to run (imp. orn, arn, earn, p. p. urnen); akin… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To catch up — Catch Catch, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Caught}or {Catched}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Catching}. Catched is rarely used.] [OE. cacchen, OF. cachier, dialectic form of chacier to hunt, F. chasser, fr. (assumend) LL. captiare, for L. capture, V. intens. of… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To dress up — Dress Dress (dr[e^]s), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Dressed} (dr[e^]st) or {Drest}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Dressing}.] [OF. drecier to make straight, raise, set up, prepare, arrange, F. dresser, (assumed) LL. directiare, fr. L. dirigere, directum, to direct;… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To train — Train Train, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Trained}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Training}.] [OF. trahiner, tra[ i]ner,F. tra[^i]ner, LL. trahinare, trainare, fr. L. trahere to draw. See {Trail}.] [1913 Webster] 1. To draw along; to trail; to drag. [1913 Webster] In …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To train a gun — Train Train, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Trained}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Training}.] [OF. trahiner, tra[ i]ner,F. tra[^i]ner, LL. trahinare, trainare, fr. L. trahere to draw. See {Trail}.] [1913 Webster] 1. To draw along; to trail; to drag. [1913 Webster] In …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • train up — PHRASAL VERB If someone trains you up, they teach you new skills or give you the necessary preparation so that you will reach the standard required for a particular job or activity. [BRIT, INFORMAL] [V n P] The first companies to go in took a… …   English dictionary

  • To take up arms — Take Take, v. t. [imp. {Took} (t[oo^]k); p. p. {Taken} (t[=a]k n); p. pr. & vb. n. {Taking}.] [Icel. taka; akin to Sw. taga, Dan. tage, Goth. t[=e]kan to touch; of uncertain origin.] 1. In an active sense; To lay hold of; to seize with the hands …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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