To top off
Top Top, v. t. 1. To cover on the top; to tip; to cap; -- chiefly used in the past participle. [1913 Webster]

Like moving mountains topped with snow. --Waller. [1913 Webster]

A mount Of alabaster, topped with golden spires. --Milton. [1913 Webster]

2. To rise above; to excel; to outgo; to surpass. [1913 Webster]

Topping all others in boasting. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

Edmund the base shall top the legitimate. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

3. To rise to the top of; to go over the top of. [1913 Webster]

But wind about till thou hast topped the hill. --Denham. [1913 Webster]

4. To take off the or upper part of; to crop. [1913 Webster]

Top your rose trees a little with your knife. --Evelyn. [1913 Webster]

5. To perform eminently, or better than before. [1913 Webster]

From endeavoring universally to top their parts, they will go universally beyond them. --Jeffrey. [1913 Webster]

6. (Naut.) To raise one end of, as a yard, so that that end becomes higher than the other. [1913 Webster]

7. (Dyeing) To cover with another dye; as, to top aniline black with methyl violet to prevent greening and crocking. [Webster 1913 Suppl.]

8. To put a stiffening piece or back on (a saw blade). [Webster 1913 Suppl.]

9. To arrange, as fruit, with the best on top. [Cant] [Webster 1913 Suppl.]

10. To strike the top of, as a wall, with the hind feet, in jumping, so as to gain new impetus; -- said of a horse. [Webster 1913 Suppl.]

11. To improve (domestic animals, esp. sheep) by crossing certain individuals or breeds with other superior. [Webster 1913 Suppl.]

12. (Naut.) To raise one end of, as a yard, so that that end becomes higher than the other. [Webster 1913 Suppl.]

13. To cut, break, or otherwise take off the top of (a steel ingot) to remove unsound metal. [Webster 1913 Suppl.]

14. (Golf) To strike (the ball) above the center; also, to make (as a stroke) by hitting the ball in this way. [Webster 1913 Suppl.]

{To top off}, (a) to complete by putting on, or finishing, the top or uppermost part of; as, to top off a stack of hay; hence, to complete; to finish; to adorn. (b) to completely fill (an almost full tank) by adding more of the liquid it already contains. [1913 Webster +PJC]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • To strike off — Strike Strike, v. t. [imp. {Struck}; p. p. {Struck}, {Stricken}({Stroock}, {Strucken}, Obs.); p. pr. & vb. n. {Striking}. Struck is more commonly used in the p. p. than stricken.] [OE. striken to strike, proceed, flow, AS. str[=i]can to go,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To turn off — Turn Turn (t[^u]rn), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Turned}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Turning}.] [OE. turnen, tournen, OF. tourner, torner, turner, F. tourner, LL. tornare, fr. L. tornare to turn in a lathe, to rounds off, fr. tornus a lathe, Gr. ? a turner s… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To head off — Head Head (h[e^]d), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Headed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Heading}.] 1. To be at the head of; to put one s self at the head of; to lead; to direct; to act as leader to; as, to head an army, an expedition, or a riot. Dryden. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To fly off — Fly Fly (fl[imac]), v. i. [imp. {Flew} (fl[=u]); p. p. {Flown} (fl[=o]n); p. pr. & vb. n. {Flying}.] [OE. fleen, fleen, fleyen, flegen, AS. fle[ o]gan; akin to D. vliegen, OHG. fliogan, G. fliegen, Icel. flj[=u]ga, Sw. flyga, Dan. flyve, Goth. us …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • top-off — /top awf , of /, n. Australian Slang. a person who informs on another, often as if by accident or as a joke. [1940 45; n. use of v. phrase top off to inform (on someone)] * * * …   Universalium

  • top off — {v.} To come or bring to a special or unexpected ending; climax. * /John batted three runs and topped off the game with a home run./ * /Mary hadn t finished her homework, she was late to school, and to top it all off she missed a surprise test./… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • top off — {v.} To come or bring to a special or unexpected ending; climax. * /John batted three runs and topped off the game with a home run./ * /Mary hadn t finished her homework, she was late to school, and to top it all off she missed a surprise test./… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • To go off the hooks — Hook Hook (h[oo^]k; 277), n. [OE. hok, AS. h[=o]c; cf. D. haak, G. hake, haken, OHG. h[=a]ko, h[=a]go, h[=a]ggo, Icel. haki, Sw. hake, Dan. hage. Cf. {Arquebuse}, {Hagbut}, {Hake}, {Hatch} a half door, {Heckle}.] 1. A piece of metal, or other… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • top off — verb a) to fill completely; to fill or refill the final portion of something not empty The waitress topped off my coffee every few minutes. b) to complete, to put the finishing touch to (something) The banquet was topped off with coffee and… …   Wiktionary

  • Top — Top, v. t. 1. To cover on the top; to tip; to cap; chiefly used in the past participle. [1913 Webster] Like moving mountains topped with snow. Waller. [1913 Webster] A mount Of alabaster, topped with golden spires. Milton. [1913 Webster] 2. To… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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