To the bitter end
Bitter Bit"ter, a. [AS. biter; akin to Goth. baitrs, Icel. bitr, Dan., Sw., D., & G. bitter, OS. bittar, fr. root of E. bite. See {Bite}, v. t.] 1. Having a peculiar, acrid, biting taste, like that of wormwood or an infusion of hops; as, a bitter medicine; bitter as aloes. [1913 Webster]

2. Causing pain or smart; piercing; painful; sharp; severe; as, a bitter cold day. [1913 Webster]

3. Causing, or fitted to cause, pain or distress to the mind; calamitous; poignant. [1913 Webster]

It is an evil thing and bitter, that thou hast forsaken the Lord thy God. --Jer. ii. 19. [1913 Webster]

4. Characterized by sharpness, severity, or cruelty; harsh; stern; virulent; as, bitter reproach. [1913 Webster]

Husbands, love your wives, and be not bitter against them. --Col. iii. 19. [1913 Webster]

5. Mournful; sad; distressing; painful; pitiable. [1913 Webster]

The Egyptians . . . made their lives bitter with hard bondage. --Ex. i. 14. [1913 Webster]

{Bitter apple}, {Bitter cucumber}, {Bitter gourd}. (Bot.) See {Colocynth}.

{Bitter cress} (Bot.), a plant of the genus {Cardamine}, esp. {Cardamine amara}.

{Bitter earth} (Min.), tale earth; calcined magnesia.

{Bitter principles} (Chem.), a class of substances, extracted from vegetable products, having strong bitter taste but with no sharply defined chemical characteristics.

{Bitter salt}, Epsom salts; magnesium sulphate.

{Bitter vetch} (Bot.), a name given to two European leguminous herbs, {Vicia Orobus} and {Ervum Ervilia}.

{To the bitter end}, to the last extremity, however calamitous. [1913 Webster]

Syn: Acrid; sharp; harsh; pungent; stinging; cutting; severe; acrimonious. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • to the bitter end — {adv. phr.} To the point of completion or conclusion. Used especially of a very painful or unpleasant task or experience. * /Although Mrs. Smith was bored by the lecture, she stayed to the bitter end./ * /They knew the war would be lost, but the… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • to the bitter end — {adv. phr.} To the point of completion or conclusion. Used especially of a very painful or unpleasant task or experience. * /Although Mrs. Smith was bored by the lecture, she stayed to the bitter end./ * /They knew the war would be lost, but the… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • The Bitter End — Single par Placebo extrait de l’album Sleeping with Ghosts Face A The Bitter End Face B Evalia Drink You Pretty Sortie 10 mars 2003 D …   Wikipédia en Français

  • The Bitter End — is a nightclub in New York City s Greenwich Village. It opened its doors in 1962 at 147 Bleecker Street under the auspices of original owner Fred Weintraub. During the early 1960s the club hosted Folk music hootenanies every week featuring many… …   Wikipedia

  • The Bitter End (song) — Infobox Single Name = The Bitter End Artist = Placebo from Album = Sleeping with Ghosts Released = 10 March 2003 Format = CD, 7 [ Recorded = ] Genre = Alternative Rock Length = 3:10 Label = Virgin Records Writer = Brian Molko; Placebo Producer =… …   Wikipedia

  • The Bitter End (Right Away, Great Captain! album) — Infobox Album | Name = The Bitter End Type = Album Artist = Right Away, Great Captain Released = 2006 Genre = Folk rock Label = Favorite Gentlemen Recordings Reviews = *AbsolutePunk.net (83%) [http://absolutepunk.net/showthread.php?t=308232 link] …   Wikipedia

  • bitter end — noun a) that part of an anchor cable which is abaft the bitts and thus remains inboard when a ship is riding at anchor Note: To pay out a rope to the bitter end means to pay it all out b) The end of a long and difficult process …   Wiktionary

  • Bitter end — can refer to: *The part of a rope that is tied off. See knot#Components. *An expression the final stage, often death. *The Bitter End, club in New York City. *The Bitter End (song), a song by alternative rock band Placebo. *The Bitter End… …   Wikipedia

  • To the Rose upon the Rood of Time — is poem by W. B. Yeats that was published in The Rose in 1893. The poem is one of many early Yeatsian lyrical poems which utilize the symbol of the rose. Meter and Rhyme Scheme The poem has twenty four lines, written in fairly regular iambic… …   Wikipedia

  • up to the last minute — {adv. phr.} Until the last possible moment; until the very end. * /When I try to send in an important eyewitness report from the scene of a major accident, I must keep working up to the last minute./ Compare: TO THE BITTER END, UNDER THE WIRE …   Dictionary of American idioms

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