To take upon
Upon Up*on", prep.[AS. uppan, uppon; upp up + on, an, on. See {Up}, and {On}.] On; -- used in all the senses of that word, with which it is interchangeable. ``Upon an hill of flowers.'' --Chaucer. [1913 Webster]

Our host upon his stirrups stood anon. --Chaucer. [1913 Webster]

Thou shalt take of the blood that is upon the altar. --Ex. xxix. 21. [1913 Webster]

The Philistines be upon thee, Samson. --Judg. xvi. 9. [1913 Webster]

As I did stand my watch upon the hill. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

He made a great difference between people that did rebel upon wantonness, and them that did rebel upon want. --Bacon. [1913 Webster]

This advantage we lost upon the invention of firearms. --Addison. [1913 Webster]

Upon the whole, it will be necessary to avoid that perpetual repetition of the same epithets which we find in Homer. --Pope. [1913 Webster]

He had abandoned the frontiers, retiring upon Glasgow. --Sir. W. Scott. [1913 Webster]

Philip swore upon the Evangelists to abstain from aggression in my absence. --Landor. [1913 Webster]

Note: Upon conveys a more distinct notion that on carries with it of something that literally or metaphorically bears or supports. It is less employed than it used to be, on having for the most part taken its place. Some expressions formed with it belong only to old style; as, upon pity they were taken away; that is, in consequence of pity: upon the rate of thirty thousand; that is, amounting to the rate: to die upon the hand; that is, by means of the hand: he had a garment upon; that is, upon himself: the time is coming fast upon; that is, upon the present time. By the omission of its object, upon acquires an adverbial sense, as in the last two examples. [1913 Webster]

{To assure upon} (Law), to promise; to undertake.

{To come upon}. See under {Come}.

{To take upon}, to assume. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • To take upon one's self — Take Take, v. t. [imp. {Took} (t[oo^]k); p. p. {Taken} (t[=a]k n); p. pr. & vb. n. {Taking}.] [Icel. taka; akin to Sw. taga, Dan. tage, Goth. t[=e]kan to touch; of uncertain origin.] 1. In an active sense; To lay hold of; to seize with the hands …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To assure upon — Upon Up*on , prep.[AS. uppan, uppon; upp up + on, an, on. See {Up}, and {On}.] On; used in all the senses of that word, with which it is interchangeable. Upon an hill of flowers. Chaucer. [1913 Webster] Our host upon his stirrups stood anon.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To come upon — Upon Up*on , prep.[AS. uppan, uppon; upp up + on, an, on. See {Up}, and {On}.] On; used in all the senses of that word, with which it is interchangeable. Upon an hill of flowers. Chaucer. [1913 Webster] Our host upon his stirrups stood anon.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To come upon — Come Come, v. i. [imp. {Came}; p. p. {Come}; p. pr & vb. n. {Coming}.] [OE. cumen, comen, AS. cuman; akin to OS.kuman, D. komen, OHG. queman, G. kommen, Icel. koma, Sw. komma, Dan. komme, Goth. giman, L. venire (gvenire), Gr. ? to go, Skr. gam.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To seize upon — Seize Seize, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Seized}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Seizing}.] [OE. seisen, saisen, OF. seisir, saisir, F. saisir, of Teutonic origin, and akin to E. set. The meaning is properly, to set, put, place, hence, to put in possession of. See… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To go upon — Go Go, v. i. [imp. {Went} (w[e^]nt); p. p. {Gone} (g[o^]n; 115); p. pr. & vb. n. {Going}. Went comes from the AS, wendan. See {Wend}, v. i.] [OE. gan, gon, AS. g[=a]n, akin to D. gaan, G. gehn, gehen, OHG. g[=e]n, g[=a]n, SW. g[*a], Dan. gaae; cf …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To put upon — Put Put, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Put}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Putting}.] [AS. potian to thrust: cf. Dan. putte to put, to put into, Fries. putje; perh. akin to W. pwtio to butt, poke, thrust; cf. also Gael. put to push, thrust, and E. potter, v. i.] 1. To …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To pass upon — Pass Pass, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Passed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Passing}.] [F. passer, LL. passare, fr. L. passus step, or from pandere, passum, to spread out, lay open. See {Pace}.] 1. To go; to move; to proceed; to be moved or transferred from one… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To fall upon — Fall Fall (f[add]l), v. i. [imp. {Fell} (f[e^]l); p. p. {Fallen} (f[add]l n); p. pr. & vb. n. {Falling}.] [AS. feallan; akin to D. vallen, OS. & OHG. fallan, G. fallen, Icel. Falla, Sw. falla, Dan. falde, Lith. pulti, L. fallere to deceive, Gr.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To stand upon — Stand Stand (st[a^]nd), v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Stood} (st[oo^]d); p. pr. & vb. n. {Standing}.] [OE. standen; AS. standan; akin to OFries. stonda, st[=a]n, D. staan, OS. standan, st[=a]n, OHG. stantan, st[=a]n, G. stehen, Icel. standa, Dan. staae,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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