To take up the gauntlet
Gauntlet Gaunt"let, n. [F. gantelet, dim. of gant glove, LL. wantus, of Teutonic origin; cf. D. want, Sw. & Dan. vante, Icel. v["o]ttr, for vantr.] 1. A glove of such material that it defends the hand from wounds. [1913 Webster]

Note: The gauntlet of the Middle Ages was sometimes of chain mail, sometimes of leather partly covered with plates, scales, etc., of metal sewed to it, and, in the 14th century, became a glove of small steel plates, carefully articulated and covering the whole hand except the palm and the inside of the fingers. [1913 Webster]

2. A long glove, covering the wrist. [1913 Webster]

3. (Naut.) A rope on which hammocks or clothes are hung for drying. [1913 Webster]

{To take up the gauntlet}, to accept a challenge.

{To throw down the gauntlet}, to offer or send a challenge. The gauntlet or glove was thrown down by the knight challenging, and was taken up by the one who accepted the challenge; -- hence the phrases. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • To take up the gauntlet — Take Take, v. t. [imp. {Took} (t[oo^]k); p. p. {Taken} (t[=a]k n); p. pr. & vb. n. {Taking}.] [Icel. taka; akin to Sw. taga, Dan. tage, Goth. t[=e]kan to touch; of uncertain origin.] 1. In an active sense; To lay hold of; to seize with the hands …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • take up the gauntlet — Respectively, to give and to accept a challenge ● gauntlet * * * take up (or throw down) the gauntlet accept (or issue) a challenge Origin: from the medieval custom of issuing a challenge by throwing one s gauntlet to the ground; whoever picked… …   Useful english dictionary

  • take up the gauntlet — pick/take up the gauntlet throw down the gauntlet to invite someone to argue, fight, or compete with you. He challenged me to a game of squash last week and I m thinking I might just take up the gauntlet …   New idioms dictionary

  • take up the gauntlet — verb To accept a challenge. He doesnt read Greek, but he really took up the gauntlet and did his best to understand the letter, anyway …   Wiktionary

  • take up the gauntlet — ► take up (or throw down) the gauntlet accept (or issue) a challenge. [ORIGIN: from the medieval custom of issuing a challenge by throwing one s gauntlet to the ground; whoever picked it up was deemed to have accepted the challenge.] Main Entry:… …   English terms dictionary

  • take up the gauntlet — idi to accept a challenge to fight …   From formal English to slang

  • pick/take up the gauntlet — to show that you are willing and ready to fight, argue, or compete with someone or to do something that is difficult but necessary : to accept or respond to a challenge The time has come for Congress to pick up the gauntlet and do something abou …   Useful english dictionary

  • To throw down the gauntlet — Gauntlet Gaunt let, n. [F. gantelet, dim. of gant glove, LL. wantus, of Teutonic origin; cf. D. want, Sw. & Dan. vante, Icel. v[ o]ttr, for vantr.] 1. A glove of such material that it defends the hand from wounds. [1913 Webster] Note: The… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To take up — Take Take, v. t. [imp. {Took} (t[oo^]k); p. p. {Taken} (t[=a]k n); p. pr. & vb. n. {Taking}.] [Icel. taka; akin to Sw. taga, Dan. tage, Goth. t[=e]kan to touch; of uncertain origin.] 1. In an active sense; To lay hold of; to seize with the hands …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To take up arms — Take Take, v. t. [imp. {Took} (t[oo^]k); p. p. {Taken} (t[=a]k n); p. pr. & vb. n. {Taking}.] [Icel. taka; akin to Sw. taga, Dan. tage, Goth. t[=e]kan to touch; of uncertain origin.] 1. In an active sense; To lay hold of; to seize with the hands …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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