To take to
Take Take, v. i. 1. To take hold; to fix upon anything; to have the natural or intended effect; to accomplish a purpose; as, he was inoculated, but the virus did not take. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

When flame taketh and openeth, it giveth a noise. --Bacon. [1913 Webster]

In impressions from mind to mind, the impression taketh, but is overcome . . . before it work any manifest effect. --Bacon. [1913 Webster]

2. To please; to gain reception; to succeed. [1913 Webster]

Each wit may praise it for his own dear sake, And hint he writ it, if the thing should take. --Addison. [1913 Webster]

3. To move or direct the course; to resort; to betake one's self; to proceed; to go; -- usually with to; as, the fox, being hard pressed, took to the hedge. [1913 Webster]

4. To admit of being pictured, as in a photograph; as, his face does not take well. [1913 Webster]

{To take after}. (a) To learn to follow; to copy; to imitate; as, he takes after a good pattern. (b) To resemble; as, the son takes after his father.

{To take in with}, to resort to. [Obs.] --Bacon.

{To take on}, to be violently affected; to express grief or pain in a violent manner.

{To take to}. (a) To apply one's self to; to be fond of; to become attached to; as, to take to evil practices. ``If he does but take to you, . . . you will contract a great friendship with him.'' --Walpole. (b) To resort to; to betake one's self to. ``Men of learning, who take to business, discharge it generally with greater honesty than men of the world.'' --Addison.

{To take up}. (a) To stop. [Obs.] ``Sinners at last take up and settle in a contempt of religion.'' --Tillotson. (b) To reform. [Obs.] --Locke.

{To take up with}. (a) To be contended to receive; to receive without opposition; to put up with; as, to take up with plain fare. ``In affairs which may have an extensive influence on our future happiness, we should not take up with probabilities.'' --I. Watts. (b) To lodge with; to dwell with. [Obs.] --L'Estrange.

{To take with}, to please. --Bacon. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • To take to wife — Wife Wife, n.; pl. {Wives}. [OE. wif, AS. wif; akin to OFries. & OS. wif, D. wijf, G. weib, OHG. w[=i]b, Icel. v[=i]f, Dan. viv; and perhaps to Skr. vip excited, agitated, inspired, vip to tremble, L. vibrare to vibrate, E. vibrate. Cf. Tacitus,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To take to heart — Heart Heart (h[aum]rt), n. [OE. harte, herte, heorte, AS. heorte; akin to OS. herta, OFies. hirte, D. hart, OHG. herza, G. herz, Icel. hjarta, Sw. hjerta, Goth. ha[ i]rt[=o], Lith. szirdis, Russ. serdtse, Ir. cridhe, L. cor, Gr. kardi a, kh^r.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To take to the heels — Heel Heel, n. [OE. hele, heele, AS. h[=e]la, perh. for h[=o]hila, fr. AS. h[=o]h heel (cf. {Hough}); but cf. D. hiel, OFries. heila, h[=e]la, Icel. h[ae]ll, Dan. h[ae]l, Sw. h[ a]l, and L. calx. [root]12. Cf. {Inculcate}.] 1. The hinder part of… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To take to the road — Road Road (r[=o]), n. [AS. r[=a]d a riding, that on which one rides or travels, a road, fr. r[=i]dan to ride. See {Ride}, and cf. {Raid}.] 1. A journey, or stage of a journey. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] With easy roads he came to Leicester. Shak.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To take to task — Task Task (t[.a]sk), n. [OE. taske, OF. tasque, F. t[^a]che, for tasche, LL. tasca, taxa, fr. L. taxare to rate, appraise, estimate. See {Tax}, n. & v.] 1. Labor or study imposed by another, often in a definite quantity or amount. [1913 Webster]… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To fall to — Fall Fall (f[add]l), v. i. [imp. {Fell} (f[e^]l); p. p. {Fallen} (f[add]l n); p. pr. & vb. n. {Falling}.] [AS. feallan; akin to D. vallen, OS. & OHG. fallan, G. fallen, Icel. Falla, Sw. falla, Dan. falde, Lith. pulti, L. fallere to deceive, Gr.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To bring to — Bring Bring, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Brought}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Bringing}.] [OE. bringen, AS. bringan; akin to OS. brengian, D. brengen, Fries. brenga, OHG. bringan, G. bringen, Goth. briggan.] 1. To convey to the place where the speaker is or is to …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To turn to — Turn Turn, v. i. 1. To move round; to have a circular motion; to revolve entirely, repeatedly, or partially; to change position, so as to face differently; to whirl or wheel round; as, a wheel turns on its axis; a spindle turns on a pivot; a man… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To come to — Come Come, v. i. [imp. {Came}; p. p. {Come}; p. pr & vb. n. {Coming}.] [OE. cumen, comen, AS. cuman; akin to OS.kuman, D. komen, OHG. queman, G. kommen, Icel. koma, Sw. komma, Dan. komme, Goth. giman, L. venire (gvenire), Gr. ? to go, Skr. gam.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To put to — Put Put, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Put}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Putting}.] [AS. potian to thrust: cf. Dan. putte to put, to put into, Fries. putje; perh. akin to W. pwtio to butt, poke, thrust; cf. also Gael. put to push, thrust, and E. potter, v. i.] 1. To …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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