To stop over
Stop Stop, v. i. 1. To cease to go on; to halt, or stand still; to come to a stop. [1913 Webster]

He bites his lip, and starts; Stops on a sudden, looks upon the ground; Then lays his finger on his temple: strait Springs out into fast gait; then stops again. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

2. To cease from any motion, or course of action. [1913 Webster]

Stop, while ye may, suspend your mad career! --Cowper. [1913 Webster]

3. To spend a short time; to reside temporarily; to stay; to tarry; as, to stop with a friend. [Colloq.] [1913 Webster]

By stopping at home till the money was gone. --R. D. Blackmore. [1913 Webster]

{To stop over}, to stop at a station or airport beyond the time of the departure of the train or airplane on which one came, with the purpose of continuing one's journey on a subsequent train or airplane; to break one's journey. See {stopover}, n. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • To bring over — Bring Bring, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Brought}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Bringing}.] [OE. bringen, AS. bringan; akin to OS. brengian, D. brengen, Fries. brenga, OHG. bringan, G. bringen, Goth. briggan.] 1. To convey to the place where the speaker is or is to …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To put over — Put Put, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Put}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Putting}.] [AS. potian to thrust: cf. Dan. putte to put, to put into, Fries. putje; perh. akin to W. pwtio to butt, poke, thrust; cf. also Gael. put to push, thrust, and E. potter, v. i.] 1. To …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To hold over — Hold Hold, v. i. In general, to keep one s self in a given position or condition; to remain fixed. Hence: [1913 Webster] 1. Not to move; to halt; to stop; mostly in the imperative. [1913 Webster] And damned be him that first cries, Hold, enough!… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To turn over — Turn Turn (t[^u]rn), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Turned}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Turning}.] [OE. turnen, tournen, OF. tourner, torner, turner, F. tourner, LL. tornare, fr. L. tornare to turn in a lathe, to rounds off, fr. tornus a lathe, Gr. ? a turner s… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To set over — Set Set (s[e^]t), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Set}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Setting}.] [OE. setten, AS. setton; akin to OS. settian, OFries. setta, D. zetten, OHG. sezzen, G. setzen, Icel. setja, Sw. s[ a]tta, Dan. s?tte, Goth. satjan; causative from the root… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To blow over — Blow Blow, v. i. [imp. {Blew} (bl[=u]); p. p. {Blown} (bl[=o]n); p. pr. & vb. n. {Blowing}.] [OE. blawen, blowen, AS. bl[=a]wan to blow, as wind; akin to OHG. pl[=a]jan, G. bl[ a]hen, to blow up, swell, L. flare to blow, Gr. ekflai nein to spout… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To lie over — Lie Lie, v. i. [imp. {Lay} (l[=a]); p. p. {Lain} (l[=a]n), ({Lien} (l[imac] [e^]n), Obs.); p. pr. & vb. n. {Lying}.] [OE. lien, liggen, AS. licgan; akin to D. liggen, OHG. ligen, licken, G. liegen, Icel. liggja, Sw. ligga, Dan. ligge, Goth. ligan …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Stop-over — Stopover Stop o ver, Stop over Stop o ver, a. Permitting one to stop over; as, a stop over check or ticket. See {To stop over}, under {Stop}, v. i. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To turn over a new leaf — Turn Turn (t[^u]rn), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Turned}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Turning}.] [OE. turnen, tournen, OF. tourner, torner, turner, F. tourner, LL. tornare, fr. L. tornare to turn in a lathe, to rounds off, fr. tornus a lathe, Gr. ? a turner s… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • stop over — verb To interrupt ones journey for a short (sometimes overnight) stay; to stop off. See Also: stopover, stop over …   Wiktionary

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