To step out
Step Step, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Stepped}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Stepping}.] [AS. st[ae]ppan; akin to OFries. steppa, D. stappen to step, stap a step, OHG. stepfen to step, G. stapfe a footstep, OHG. stapfo, G. stufe a step to step on; cf. Gr. ? to shake about, handle roughly, stamp (?). Cf. {Stamp}, n. & a.] 1. To move the foot in walking; to advance or recede by raising and moving one of the feet to another resting place, or by moving both feet in succession. [1913 Webster]

2. To walk; to go on foot; esp., to walk a little distance; as, to step to one of the neighbors. [1913 Webster]

3. To walk slowly, gravely, or resolutely. [1913 Webster]

Home the swain retreats, His flock before him stepping to the fold. --Thomson. [1913 Webster]

4. Fig.: To move mentally; to go in imagination. [1913 Webster]

They are stepping almost three thousand years back into the remotest antiquity. --Pope. [1913 Webster]

{To step aside}, to walk a little distance from the rest; to retire from company.

{To step forth}, to move or come forth.

{To step in} or {To step into}. (a) To walk or advance into a place or state, or to advance suddenly in. [1913 Webster]

Whosoever then first, after the troubling of the water, stepped in, was made whole of whatsoever disease he had. --John v. 4. [1913 Webster] (b) To enter for a short time; as, I just stepped into the house. (c) To obtain possession without trouble; to enter upon easily or suddenly; as, to step into an estate.

{To step out}. (a) (Mil.) To increase the length, but not the rapidity, of the step, extending it to thirty-tree inches. (b) To go out for a short distance or a short time.

{To step short} (Mil.), to diminish the length or rapidity of the step according to the established rules. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • To go out — Go Go, v. i. [imp. {Went} (w[e^]nt); p. p. {Gone} (g[o^]n; 115); p. pr. & vb. n. {Going}. Went comes from the AS, wendan. See {Wend}, v. i.] [OE. gan, gon, AS. g[=a]n, akin to D. gaan, G. gehn, gehen, OHG. g[=e]n, g[=a]n, SW. g[*a], Dan. gaae; cf …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To run out — Run Run, v. i. [imp. {Ran}or {Run}; p. p. {Run}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Running}.] [OE. rinnen, rennen (imp. ran, p. p. runnen, ronnen). AS. rinnan to flow (imp. ran, p. p. gerunnen), and iernan, irnan, to run (imp. orn, arn, earn, p. p. urnen); akin… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To stamp out — Stamp Stamp (st[a^]mp) v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Stamped} (st[a^]mt; 215); p. pr. & vb. n. {Stamping}.] [OE. stampen; akin to LG. & D. stampen, G. stampfen, OHG. stampf[=o]n, Dan. stampe, Sw. stampa, Icel. stappa, G. stampf a pestle and E. step. See… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To cut out — Cut Cut (k[u^]t), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Cut}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Cutting}.] [OE. cutten, kitten, ketten; prob. of Celtic origin; cf. W. cwtau to shorten, curtail, dock, cwta bobtailed, cwt tail, skirt, Gael. cutaich to shorten, curtail, dock, cutach …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To come out — Come Come, v. i. [imp. {Came}; p. p. {Come}; p. pr & vb. n. {Coming}.] [OE. cumen, comen, AS. cuman; akin to OS.kuman, D. komen, OHG. queman, G. kommen, Icel. koma, Sw. komma, Dan. komme, Goth. giman, L. venire (gvenire), Gr. ? to go, Skr. gam.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To mark out — Mark Mark (m[aum]rk), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Marked} (m[aum]rkt); p. pr. & vb. n. {Marking}.] [OE. marken, merken, AS. mearcian, from mearc. See {Mark} the sign.] 1. To put a mark upon; to affix a significant mark to; to make recognizable by a… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To tread out — Tread Tread, v. t. 1. To step or walk on. [1913 Webster] Forbid to tread the promised land he saw. Prior. [1913 Webster] Methought she trod the ground with greater grace. Dryden. [1913 Webster] 2. To beat or press with the feet; as, to tread a… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To dress out — Dress Dress (dr[e^]s), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Dressed} (dr[e^]st) or {Drest}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Dressing}.] [OF. drecier to make straight, raise, set up, prepare, arrange, F. dresser, (assumed) LL. directiare, fr. L. dirigere, directum, to direct;… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To step aside — Step Step, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Stepped}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Stepping}.] [AS. st[ae]ppan; akin to OFries. steppa, D. stappen to step, stap a step, OHG. stepfen to step, G. stapfe a footstep, OHG. stapfo, G. stufe a step to step on; cf. Gr. ? to… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To step forth — Step Step, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Stepped}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Stepping}.] [AS. st[ae]ppan; akin to OFries. steppa, D. stappen to step, stap a step, OHG. stepfen to step, G. stapfe a footstep, OHG. stapfo, G. stufe a step to step on; cf. Gr. ? to… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”