To step off
Step Step, v. t. 1. To set, as the foot. [1913 Webster]

2. (Naut.) To fix the foot of (a mast) in its step; to erect. [1913 Webster]

{To step off}, to measure by steps, or paces; hence, to divide, as a space, or to form a series of marks, by successive measurements, as with dividers. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • To go off — Go Go, v. i. [imp. {Went} (w[e^]nt); p. p. {Gone} (g[o^]n; 115); p. pr. & vb. n. {Going}. Went comes from the AS, wendan. See {Wend}, v. i.] [OE. gan, gon, AS. g[=a]n, akin to D. gaan, G. gehn, gehen, OHG. g[=e]n, g[=a]n, SW. g[*a], Dan. gaae; cf …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To come off — Come Come, v. i. [imp. {Came}; p. p. {Come}; p. pr & vb. n. {Coming}.] [OE. cumen, comen, AS. cuman; akin to OS.kuman, D. komen, OHG. queman, G. kommen, Icel. koma, Sw. komma, Dan. komme, Goth. giman, L. venire (gvenire), Gr. ? to go, Skr. gam.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To cut off — Cut Cut (k[u^]t), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Cut}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Cutting}.] [OE. cutten, kitten, ketten; prob. of Celtic origin; cf. W. cwtau to shorten, curtail, dock, cwta bobtailed, cwt tail, skirt, Gael. cutaich to shorten, curtail, dock, cutach …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To pass off — Pass Pass, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Passed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Passing}.] [F. passer, LL. passare, fr. L. passus step, or from pandere, passum, to spread out, lay open. See {Pace}.] 1. To go; to move; to proceed; to be moved or transferred from one… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • step off the curb — in. to die. □ Ralph almost stepped off the curb during his operation. □ I’m too young to step off the curb …   Dictionary of American slang and colloquial expressions

  • step off — {v.} 1. To walk or march quickly. * /The drum major lowered his baton and the band stepped off./ 2. or[pace off]. To measure by taking a series of steps in a line. * /The farmer stepped off the edge of the field to see how much fencing he would… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • step off — {v.} 1. To walk or march quickly. * /The drum major lowered his baton and the band stepped off./ 2. or[pace off]. To measure by taking a series of steps in a line. * /The farmer stepped off the edge of the field to see how much fencing he would… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • To come off by — Come Come, v. i. [imp. {Came}; p. p. {Come}; p. pr & vb. n. {Coming}.] [OE. cumen, comen, AS. cuman; akin to OS.kuman, D. komen, OHG. queman, G. kommen, Icel. koma, Sw. komma, Dan. komme, Goth. giman, L. venire (gvenire), Gr. ? to go, Skr. gam.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To come off from — Come Come, v. i. [imp. {Came}; p. p. {Come}; p. pr & vb. n. {Coming}.] [OE. cumen, comen, AS. cuman; akin to OS.kuman, D. komen, OHG. queman, G. kommen, Icel. koma, Sw. komma, Dan. komme, Goth. giman, L. venire (gvenire), Gr. ? to go, Skr. gam.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • step off — v To back away, back off. You better step off before you get in trouble! 1980s …   Historical dictionary of American slang

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”