To start after
start start (st[aum]rt), v. i. [imp. & p. p. {started}; p. pr. & vb. n. {starting}.] [OE. sterten; akin to D. storten to hurl, rush, fall, G. st["u]rzen, OHG. sturzen to turn over, to fall, Sw. st["o]rta to cast down, to fall, Dan. styrte, and probably also to E. start a tail; the original sense being, perhaps, to show the tail, to tumble over suddenly. [root]166. Cf. {Start} a tail.] 1. To leap; to jump. [Obs.] [1913 Webster]

2. To move suddenly, as with a spring or leap, from surprise, pain, or other sudden feeling or emotion, or by a voluntary act. [1913 Webster]

And maketh him out of his sleep to start. --Chaucer. [1913 Webster]

I start as from some dreadful dream. --Dryden. [1913 Webster]

Keep your soul to the work when ready to start aside. --I. Watts. [1913 Webster]

But if he start, It is the flesh of a corrupted heart. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

3. To set out; to commence a course, as a race or journey; to begin; as, to start in business. [1913 Webster]

At once they start, advancing in a line. --Dryden. [1913 Webster]

At intervals some bird from out the brakes Starts into voice a moment, then is still. --Byron. [1913 Webster]

4. To become somewhat displaced or loosened; as, a rivet or a seam may start under strain or pressure. [1913 Webster]

{To start after}, to set out after; to follow; to pursue.

{To start against}, to act as a rival candidate against.

{To start for}, to be a candidate for, as an office.

{To start up}, to rise suddenly, as from a seat or couch; to come suddenly into notice or importance. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • To start against — start start (st[aum]rt), v. i. [imp. & p. p. {started}; p. pr. & vb. n. {starting}.] [OE. sterten; akin to D. storten to hurl, rush, fall, G. st[ u]rzen, OHG. sturzen to turn over, to fall, Sw. st[ o]rta to cast down, to fall, Dan. styrte, and… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To start for — start start (st[aum]rt), v. i. [imp. & p. p. {started}; p. pr. & vb. n. {starting}.] [OE. sterten; akin to D. storten to hurl, rush, fall, G. st[ u]rzen, OHG. sturzen to turn over, to fall, Sw. st[ o]rta to cast down, to fall, Dan. styrte, and… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To start up — start start (st[aum]rt), v. i. [imp. & p. p. {started}; p. pr. & vb. n. {starting}.] [OE. sterten; akin to D. storten to hurl, rush, fall, G. st[ u]rzen, OHG. sturzen to turn over, to fall, Sw. st[ o]rta to cast down, to fall, Dan. styrte, and… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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  • start — (st[aum]rt), v. i. [imp. & p. p. {started}; p. pr. & vb. n. {starting}.] [OE. sterten; akin to D. storten to hurl, rush, fall, G. st[ u]rzen, OHG. sturzen to turn over, to fall, Sw. st[ o]rta to cast down, to fall, Dan. styrte, and probably also… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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