To spring a rattle
Spring Spring (spr[i^]ng), v. t. 1. To cause to spring up; to start or rouse, as game; to cause to rise from the earth, or from a covert; as, to spring a pheasant. [1913 Webster]

2. To produce or disclose suddenly or unexpectedly; as, to spring a surprise on someone; to spring a joke. [1913 Webster]

She starts, and leaves her bed, and springs a light. --Dryden. [1913 Webster]

The friends to the cause sprang a new project. --Swift. [1913 Webster]

3. To cause to explode; as, to spring a mine. [1913 Webster]

4. To crack or split; to bend or strain so as to weaken; as, to spring a mast or a yard. [1913 Webster]

5. To cause to close suddenly, as the parts of a trap operated by a spring; as, to spring a trap. [1913 Webster]

6. To bend by force, as something stiff or strong; to force or put by bending, as a beam into its sockets, and allowing it to straighten when in place; -- often with in, out, etc.; as, to spring in a slat or a bar. [1913 Webster]

7. To pass over by leaping; as, to spring a fence. [1913 Webster]

8. To release (a person) from confinement, especially from a prison. [colloquial] [PJC]

{To spring a butt} (Naut.), to loosen the end of a plank in a ship's bottom.

{To spring a leak} (Naut.), to begin to leak.

{To spring an arch} (Arch.), to build an arch; -- a common term among masons; as, to spring an arch over a lintel.

{To spring a rattle}, to cause a rattle to sound. See {Watchman's rattle}, under {Watchman}.

{To spring the luff} (Naut.), to ease the helm, and sail nearer to the wind than before; -- said of a vessel. --Mar. Dict.

{To spring a mast} or {To spring a spar} (Naut.), to strain it so that it is unserviceable. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • To spring a rattle — Rattle Rat tle, n. 1. A rapid succession of sharp, clattering sounds; as, the rattle of a drum. Prior. [1913 Webster] 2. Noisy, rapid talk. [1913 Webster] All this ado about the golden age is but an empty rattle and frivolous conceit. Hakewill.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To spring a butt — Spring Spring (spr[i^]ng), v. t. 1. To cause to spring up; to start or rouse, as game; to cause to rise from the earth, or from a covert; as, to spring a pheasant. [1913 Webster] 2. To produce or disclose suddenly or unexpectedly; as, to spring a …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To spring a leak — Spring Spring (spr[i^]ng), v. t. 1. To cause to spring up; to start or rouse, as game; to cause to rise from the earth, or from a covert; as, to spring a pheasant. [1913 Webster] 2. To produce or disclose suddenly or unexpectedly; as, to spring a …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To spring a mast — Spring Spring (spr[i^]ng), v. t. 1. To cause to spring up; to start or rouse, as game; to cause to rise from the earth, or from a covert; as, to spring a pheasant. [1913 Webster] 2. To produce or disclose suddenly or unexpectedly; as, to spring a …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To spring a spar — Spring Spring (spr[i^]ng), v. t. 1. To cause to spring up; to start or rouse, as game; to cause to rise from the earth, or from a covert; as, to spring a pheasant. [1913 Webster] 2. To produce or disclose suddenly or unexpectedly; as, to spring a …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To spring an arch — Spring Spring (spr[i^]ng), v. t. 1. To cause to spring up; to start or rouse, as game; to cause to rise from the earth, or from a covert; as, to spring a pheasant. [1913 Webster] 2. To produce or disclose suddenly or unexpectedly; as, to spring a …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To spring the luff — Spring Spring (spr[i^]ng), v. t. 1. To cause to spring up; to start or rouse, as game; to cause to rise from the earth, or from a covert; as, to spring a pheasant. [1913 Webster] 2. To produce or disclose suddenly or unexpectedly; as, to spring a …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Spring — (spr[i^]ng), v. t. 1. To cause to spring up; to start or rouse, as game; to cause to rise from the earth, or from a covert; as, to spring a pheasant. [1913 Webster] 2. To produce or disclose suddenly or unexpectedly; as, to spring a surprise on… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Rattle — Rat tle, n. 1. A rapid succession of sharp, clattering sounds; as, the rattle of a drum. Prior. [1913 Webster] 2. Noisy, rapid talk. [1913 Webster] All this ado about the golden age is but an empty rattle and frivolous conceit. Hakewill. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • spring — A device on the suspension system to cushion and absorb shocks and bumps and to keep the vehicle level on turns. After the stress or pressure exerted by the flexing of the spring has been removed, the spring returns to its original state. The… …   Dictionary of automotive terms

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”