To speak of
Speak Speak, v. i. [imp. {Spoke}({Spake}Archaic); p. p. {Spoken}({Spoke}, Obs. or Colloq.); p. pr. & vb. n. {Speaking}.] [OE. speken, AS. specan, sprecan; akin to OF.ries. spreka, D. spreken, OS. spreken, G. sprechen, OHG. sprehhan, and perhaps to Skr. sph[=u]rj to crackle, to thunder. Cf. {Spark} of fire, {Speech}.] 1. To utter words or articulate sounds, as human beings; to express thoughts by words; as, the organs may be so obstructed that a man may not be able to speak. [1913 Webster]

Till at the last spake in this manner. --Chaucer. [1913 Webster]

Speak, Lord; for thy servant heareth. --1 Sam. iii. 9. [1913 Webster]

2. To express opinions; to say; to talk; to converse. [1913 Webster]

That fluid substance in a few minutes begins to set, as the tradesmen speak. --Boyle. [1913 Webster]

An honest man, is able to speak for himself, when a knave is not. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

During the century and a half which followed the Conquest, there is, to speak strictly, no English history. --Macaulay. [1913 Webster]

3. To utter a speech, discourse, or harangue; to adress a public assembly formally. [1913 Webster]

Many of the nobility made themselves popular by speaking in Parliament against those things which were most grateful to his majesty. --Clarendon. [1913 Webster]

4. To discourse; to make mention; to tell. [1913 Webster]

Lycan speaks of a part of C[ae]sar's army that came to him from the Leman Lake. --Addison. [1913 Webster]

5. To give sound; to sound. [1913 Webster]

Make all our trumpets speak. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

6. To convey sentiments, ideas, or intelligence as if by utterance; as, features that speak of self-will. [1913 Webster]

Thine eye begins to speak. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

{To speak of}, to take account of, to make mention of. --Robynson (More's Utopia).

{To speak out}, to speak loudly and distinctly; also, to speak unreservedly.

{To speak well for}, to commend; to be favorable to.

{To speak with}, to converse with. ``Would you speak with me?'' --Shak. [1913 Webster]

Syn: To say; tell; talk; converse; discourse; articulate; pronounce; utter. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • to speak of — {adj. phr.}, {informal} Important; worth talking about; worth noticing. Usually used in negative sentences. * /Did it rain yesterday? Not to speak of./ * /What happened at the meeting? Nothing to speak of./ * /Judy s injuries were nothing to… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • to speak of — {adj. phr.}, {informal} Important; worth talking about; worth noticing. Usually used in negative sentences. * /Did it rain yesterday? Not to speak of./ * /What happened at the meeting? Nothing to speak of./ * /Judy s injuries were nothing to… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • to speak of — phrasal worthy of mention or notice usually used in negative constructions < no progress to speak of > …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • No Wings to Speak Of — EP by Hopesfall Released August 8, 2001 …   Wikipedia

  • How (Not) To Speak Of God — is a non fiction work by Peter Rollins, the co ordinator of an emerging church group called Ikon. Influenced by Ikon services, the book aims to re envisage faith in the postmodern world, moving away from dogmatic certainties and towards an… …   Wikipedia

  • not to speak of — See: NOT TO MENTION …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • not to speak of — See: NOT TO MENTION …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • To tell of — Tell Tell, v. i. 1. To give an account; to make report. [1913 Webster] That I may publish with the voice of thankgiving, and tell of all thy wondrous works. Ps. xxvi. 7. [1913 Webster] 2. To take effect; to produce a marked effect; as, every shot …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To talk of — Talk Talk, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Talked}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Talking}.] [Cf. LG. talk talk, gabble, Prov. G. talken to speak indistinctly; or OD. tolken to interpret, MHG. tolkan to interpret, to tell, to speak indistinctly, Dan. tolke to interpret …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To know of — Know Know, v. i. 1. To have knowledge; to have a clear and certain perception; to possess wisdom, instruction, or information; often with of. [1913 Webster] Israel doth not know, my people doth not consider. Is. i. 3. [1913 Webster] If any man… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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