To sound in
Sound Sound, v. i. [OE. sounen, sownen, OF. soner, suner, F. sonner, from L. sonare. See {Sound} a noise.] 1. To make a noise; to utter a voice; to make an impulse of the air that shall strike the organs of hearing with a perceptible effect. ``And first taught speaking trumpets how to sound.'' --Dryden. [1913 Webster]

How silver-sweet sound lovers' tongues! --Shak. [1913 Webster]

2. To be conveyed in sound; to be spread or published; to convey intelligence by sound. [1913 Webster]

From you sounded out the word of the Lord. --1 Thess. i. 8. [1913 Webster]

3. To make or convey a certain impression, or to have a certain import, when heard; hence, to seem; to appear; as, this reproof sounds harsh; the story sounds like an invention. [1913 Webster]

Good sir, why do you start, and seem to fear Things that do sound so fair? --Shak. [1913 Webster]

{To sound in} or {To sound into}, to tend to; to partake of the nature of; to be consonant with. [Obs., except in the phrase To sound in damages, below.] [1913 Webster]

Soun[d]ing in moral virtue was his speech. --Chaucer. [1913 Webster]

{To sound in damages} (Law), to have the essential quality of damages. This is said of an action brought, not for the recovery of a specific thing, as replevin, etc., but for damages only, as trespass, and the like. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • To sound in damages — Sound Sound, v. i. [OE. sounen, sownen, OF. soner, suner, F. sonner, from L. sonare. See {Sound} a noise.] 1. To make a noise; to utter a voice; to make an impulse of the air that shall strike the organs of hearing with a perceptible effect. And… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To strike in — Strike Strike, v. i. To move; to advance; to proceed; to take a course; as, to strike into the fields. [1913 Webster] A mouse . . . struck forth sternly [bodily]. Piers Plowman. [1913 Webster] 2. To deliver a quick blow or thrust; to give blows.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To ring in — Ring Ring (r[i^]ng), v. t. [imp. {Rang} (r[a^]ng) or {Rung} (r[u^]ng); p. p. {Rung}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Ringing}.] [AS. hringan; akin to Icel. hringja, Sw. ringa, Dan. ringe, OD. ringhen, ringkelen. [root]19.] 1. To cause to sound, especially by… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To held in — Hold Hold, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Held}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Holding}. {Holden}, p. p., is obs. in elegant writing, though still used in legal language.] [OE. haldan, D. houden, OHG. hoten, Icel. halda, Dan. holde, Sw. h[*a]lla, Goth. haldan to feed,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To sound into — Sound Sound, v. i. [OE. sounen, sownen, OF. soner, suner, F. sonner, from L. sonare. See {Sound} a noise.] 1. To make a noise; to utter a voice; to make an impulse of the air that shall strike the organs of hearing with a perceptible effect. And… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Sound-in-Syncs — is a method of multiplexing sound and video signals into a channel designed to carry video, in which data representing the sound is inserted into the line synchronising pulse of an analogue TV waveform. This is used on point to point links within …   Wikipedia

  • To strike in with — Strike Strike, v. i. To move; to advance; to proceed; to take a course; as, to strike into the fields. [1913 Webster] A mouse . . . struck forth sternly [bodily]. Piers Plowman. [1913 Webster] 2. To deliver a quick blow or thrust; to give blows.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To sound the charge — Charge Charge, n. [F. charge, fr. charger to load. See {Charge}, v. t., and cf. {Cargo}, {Caricature}.] 1. A load or burder laid upon a person or thing. [1913 Webster] 2. A person or thing commited or intrusted to the care, custody, or management …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To break in upon — Break Break (br[=a]k), v. i. 1. To come apart or divide into two or more pieces, usually with suddenness and violence; to part; to burst asunder. [1913 Webster] 2. To open spontaneously, or by pressure from within, as a bubble, a tumor, a seed… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To hold in hand — Hold Hold, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Held}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Holding}. {Holden}, p. p., is obs. in elegant writing, though still used in legal language.] [OE. haldan, D. houden, OHG. hoten, Icel. halda, Dan. holde, Sw. h[*a]lla, Goth. haldan to feed,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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