To sound in
Sound Sound, v. i. [OE. sounen, sownen, OF. soner, suner, F. sonner, from L. sonare. See {Sound} a noise.] 1. To make a noise; to utter a voice; to make an impulse of the air that shall strike the organs of hearing with a perceptible effect. ``And first taught speaking trumpets how to sound.'' --Dryden. [1913 Webster]

How silver-sweet sound lovers' tongues! --Shak. [1913 Webster]

2. To be conveyed in sound; to be spread or published; to convey intelligence by sound. [1913 Webster]

From you sounded out the word of the Lord. --1 Thess. i. 8. [1913 Webster]

3. To make or convey a certain impression, or to have a certain import, when heard; hence, to seem; to appear; as, this reproof sounds harsh; the story sounds like an invention. [1913 Webster]

Good sir, why do you start, and seem to fear Things that do sound so fair? --Shak. [1913 Webster]

{To sound in} or {To sound into}, to tend to; to partake of the nature of; to be consonant with. [Obs., except in the phrase To sound in damages, below.] [1913 Webster]

Soun[d]ing in moral virtue was his speech. --Chaucer. [1913 Webster]

{To sound in damages} (Law), to have the essential quality of damages. This is said of an action brought, not for the recovery of a specific thing, as replevin, etc., but for damages only, as trespass, and the like. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • To sound in damages — Sound Sound, v. i. [OE. sounen, sownen, OF. soner, suner, F. sonner, from L. sonare. See {Sound} a noise.] 1. To make a noise; to utter a voice; to make an impulse of the air that shall strike the organs of hearing with a perceptible effect. And… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To strike in — Strike Strike, v. i. To move; to advance; to proceed; to take a course; as, to strike into the fields. [1913 Webster] A mouse . . . struck forth sternly [bodily]. Piers Plowman. [1913 Webster] 2. To deliver a quick blow or thrust; to give blows.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To ring in — Ring Ring (r[i^]ng), v. t. [imp. {Rang} (r[a^]ng) or {Rung} (r[u^]ng); p. p. {Rung}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Ringing}.] [AS. hringan; akin to Icel. hringja, Sw. ringa, Dan. ringe, OD. ringhen, ringkelen. [root]19.] 1. To cause to sound, especially by… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To held in — Hold Hold, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Held}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Holding}. {Holden}, p. p., is obs. in elegant writing, though still used in legal language.] [OE. haldan, D. houden, OHG. hoten, Icel. halda, Dan. holde, Sw. h[*a]lla, Goth. haldan to feed,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To sound into — Sound Sound, v. i. [OE. sounen, sownen, OF. soner, suner, F. sonner, from L. sonare. See {Sound} a noise.] 1. To make a noise; to utter a voice; to make an impulse of the air that shall strike the organs of hearing with a perceptible effect. And… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To strike in with — Strike Strike, v. i. To move; to advance; to proceed; to take a course; as, to strike into the fields. [1913 Webster] A mouse . . . struck forth sternly [bodily]. Piers Plowman. [1913 Webster] 2. To deliver a quick blow or thrust; to give blows.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To sound the charge — Charge Charge, n. [F. charge, fr. charger to load. See {Charge}, v. t., and cf. {Cargo}, {Caricature}.] 1. A load or burder laid upon a person or thing. [1913 Webster] 2. A person or thing commited or intrusted to the care, custody, or management …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To break in upon — Break Break (br[=a]k), v. i. 1. To come apart or divide into two or more pieces, usually with suddenness and violence; to part; to burst asunder. [1913 Webster] 2. To open spontaneously, or by pressure from within, as a bubble, a tumor, a seed… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To hold in hand — Hold Hold, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Held}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Holding}. {Holden}, p. p., is obs. in elegant writing, though still used in legal language.] [OE. haldan, D. houden, OHG. hoten, Icel. halda, Dan. holde, Sw. h[*a]lla, Goth. haldan to feed,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To hold in play — Hold Hold, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Held}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Holding}. {Holden}, p. p., is obs. in elegant writing, though still used in legal language.] [OE. haldan, D. houden, OHG. hoten, Icel. halda, Dan. holde, Sw. h[*a]lla, Goth. haldan to feed,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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