To slip a cable
Slip Slip, v. t. 1. To cause to move smoothly and quickly; to slide; to convey gently or secretly. [1913 Webster]

He tried to slip a powder into her drink. --Arbuthnot. [1913 Webster]

2. To omit; to loose by negligence. [1913 Webster]

And slip no advantage That my secure you. --B. Jonson. [1913 Webster]

3. To cut slips from; to cut; to take off; to make a slip or slips of; as, to slip a piece of cloth or paper. [1913 Webster]

The branches also may be slipped and planted. --Mortimer. [1913 Webster]

4. To let loose in pursuit of game, as a greyhound. [1913 Webster]

Lucento slipped me like his greyhound. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

5. To cause to slip or slide off, or out of place; as, a horse slips his bridle; a dog slips his collar. [1913 Webster]

6. To bring forth (young) prematurely; to slink. [1913 Webster]

{To slip a cable}. (Naut.) See under {Cable}.

{To slip off}, to take off quickly; as, to slip off a coat.

{To slip on}, to put on in haste or loosely; as, to slip on a gown or coat. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • To slip the cable — Cable Ca ble (k[=a] b l), n. [F. c[^a]ble, LL. capulum, caplum, a rope, fr. L. capere to take; cf. D., Dan., & G. kabel, from the French. See {Capable}.] 1. A large, strong rope or chain, of considerable length, used to retain a vessel at anchor …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To serve the cable — Cable Ca ble (k[=a] b l), n. [F. c[^a]ble, LL. capulum, caplum, a rope, fr. L. capere to take; cf. D., Dan., & G. kabel, from the French. See {Capable}.] 1. A large, strong rope or chain, of considerable length, used to retain a vessel at anchor …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To slip off — Slip Slip, v. t. 1. To cause to move smoothly and quickly; to slide; to convey gently or secretly. [1913 Webster] He tried to slip a powder into her drink. Arbuthnot. [1913 Webster] 2. To omit; to loose by negligence. [1913 Webster] And slip no… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To slip on — Slip Slip, v. t. 1. To cause to move smoothly and quickly; to slide; to convey gently or secretly. [1913 Webster] He tried to slip a powder into her drink. Arbuthnot. [1913 Webster] 2. To omit; to loose by negligence. [1913 Webster] And slip no… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Slip — Slip, v. t. 1. To cause to move smoothly and quickly; to slide; to convey gently or secretly. [1913 Webster] He tried to slip a powder into her drink. Arbuthnot. [1913 Webster] 2. To omit; to loose by negligence. [1913 Webster] And slip no… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • slip — slip1 [slip] vi. slipped, slipping [ME slippen < MLowG, akin to OHG slifan < IE * (s)leib , to glide, slip < base * (s)lei , slimy: see SLIDE] 1. to go quietly or secretly; move without attracting notice [to slip out of a room] 2. a) to… …   English World dictionary

  • To pay out the cable — Cable Ca ble (k[=a] b l), n. [F. c[^a]ble, LL. capulum, caplum, a rope, fr. L. capere to take; cf. D., Dan., & G. kabel, from the French. See {Capable}.] 1. A large, strong rope or chain, of considerable length, used to retain a vessel at anchor …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To veer out the cable — Cable Ca ble (k[=a] b l), n. [F. c[^a]ble, LL. capulum, caplum, a rope, fr. L. capere to take; cf. D., Dan., & G. kabel, from the French. See {Capable}.] 1. A large, strong rope or chain, of considerable length, used to retain a vessel at anchor …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Cable — Ca ble (k[=a] b l), n. [F. c[^a]ble, LL. capulum, caplum, a rope, fr. L. capere to take; cf. D., Dan., & G. kabel, from the French. See {Capable}.] 1. A large, strong rope or chain, of considerable length, used to retain a vessel at anchor, and… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • cable molding — Cable Ca ble (k[=a] b l), n. [F. c[^a]ble, LL. capulum, caplum, a rope, fr. L. capere to take; cf. D., Dan., & G. kabel, from the French. See {Capable}.] 1. A large, strong rope or chain, of considerable length, used to retain a vessel at anchor …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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