To settle on
Settle Set"tle, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Settled}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Settling}.] [OE. setlen, AS. setlan. [root]154. See {Settle}, n. In senses 7, 8, and 9 perhaps confused with OE. sahtlen to reconcile, AS. sahtlian, fr. saht reconciliation, sacon to contend, dispute. Cf. {Sake}.] 1. To place in a fixed or permanent condition; to make firm, steady, or stable; to establish; to fix; esp., to establish in life; to fix in business, in a home, or the like. [1913 Webster]

And he settled his countenance steadfastly upon him, until he was ashamed. --2 Kings viii. 11. (Rev. Ver.) [1913 Webster]

The father thought the time drew on Of setting in the world his only son. --Dryden. [1913 Webster]

2. To establish in the pastoral office; to ordain or install as pastor or rector of a church, society, or parish; as, to settle a minister. [U. S.] [1913 Webster]

3. To cause to be no longer in a disturbed condition; to render quiet; to still; to calm; to compose. [1913 Webster]

God settled then the huge whale-bearing lake. --Chapman. [1913 Webster]

Hoping that sleep might settle his brains. --Bunyan. [1913 Webster]

4. To clear of dregs and impurities by causing them to sink; to render pure or clear; -- said of a liquid; as, to settle coffee, or the grounds of coffee. [1913 Webster]

5. To restore or bring to a smooth, dry, or passable condition; -- said of the ground, of roads, and the like; as, clear weather settles the roads. [1913 Webster]

6. To cause to sink; to lower; to depress; hence, also, to render close or compact; as, to settle the contents of a barrel or bag by shaking it. [1913 Webster]

7. To determine, as something which is exposed to doubt or question; to free from unscertainty or wavering; to make sure, firm, or constant; to establish; to compose; to quiet; as, to settle the mind when agitated; to settle questions of law; to settle the succession to a throne; to settle an allowance. [1913 Webster]

It will settle the wavering, and confirm the doubtful. --Swift. [1913 Webster]

8. To adjust, as something in discussion; to make up; to compose; to pacify; as, to settle a quarrel. [1913 Webster]

9. To adjust, as accounts; to liquidate; to balance; as, to settle an account. [1913 Webster]

10. Hence, to pay; as, to settle a bill. [Colloq.] --Abbott. [1913 Webster]

11. To plant with inhabitants; to colonize; to people; as, the French first settled Canada; the Puritans settled New England; Plymouth was settled in 1620. [1913 Webster]

{To settle on} or {To settle upon}, (a) to confer upon by permanent grant; to assure to. ``I . . . have settled upon him a good annuity.'' --Addison. (b) to choose; to decide on; -- sometimes with the implication that the choice is not ideal, but the best available.

{To settle the land} (Naut.), to cause it to sink, or appear lower, by receding from it. [1913 Webster]

Syn: To fix; establish; regulate; arrange; compose; adjust; determine; decide. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • To reckon on — Reckon Reck on, v. i. 1. To make an enumeration or computation; to engage in numbering or computing. Shak. [1913 Webster] 2. To come to an accounting; to make up accounts; to settle; to examine and strike the balance of debt and credit; to adjust …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To fix on — Fix Fix, v. i. 1. To become fixed; to settle or remain permanently; to cease from wandering; to rest. [1913 Webster] Your kindness banishes your fear, Resolved to fix forever here. Waller. [1913 Webster] 2. To become firm, so as to resist… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To put on — Put Put, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Put}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Putting}.] [AS. potian to thrust: cf. Dan. putte to put, to put into, Fries. putje; perh. akin to W. pwtio to butt, poke, thrust; cf. also Gael. put to push, thrust, and E. potter, v. i.] 1. To …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To take on — Take Take, v. t. [imp. {Took} (t[oo^]k); p. p. {Taken} (t[=a]k n); p. pr. & vb. n. {Taking}.] [Icel. taka; akin to Sw. taga, Dan. tage, Goth. t[=e]kan to touch; of uncertain origin.] 1. In an active sense; To lay hold of; to seize with the hands …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To set on — Set Set (s[e^]t), v. i. 1. To pass below the horizon; to go down; to decline; to sink out of sight; to come to an end. [1913 Webster] Ere the weary sun set in the west. Shak. [1913 Webster] Thus this century sets with little mirth, and the next… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To take on — Take Take, v. i. 1. To take hold; to fix upon anything; to have the natural or intended effect; to accomplish a purpose; as, he was inoculated, but the virus did not take. Shak. [1913 Webster] When flame taketh and openeth, it giveth a noise.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To try on — Try Try, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {tried}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Trying}.] [OE. trien to select, pick out, F. trier to cull, to out, LL. tritare to triturate (hence the sense of, to thresh, to separate the grain from the straw, to select), L. terere,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To settle the land — Settle Set tle, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Settled}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Settling}.] [OE. setlen, AS. setlan. [root]154. See {Settle}, n. In senses 7, 8, and 9 perhaps confused with OE. sahtlen to reconcile, AS. sahtlian, fr. saht reconciliation, sacon to …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To settle upon — Settle Set tle, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Settled}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Settling}.] [OE. setlen, AS. setlan. [root]154. See {Settle}, n. In senses 7, 8, and 9 perhaps confused with OE. sahtlen to reconcile, AS. sahtlian, fr. saht reconciliation, sacon to …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • settle on — {v. phr.} To decide which one to choose among various alternatives. * /My parents have been debating what kind of a car to get and have finally settled on a BMW from Germany./ …   Dictionary of American idioms

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