To set one's cap for
Cap Cap (k[a^]p), n. [OE. cappe, AS. c[ae]ppe, cap, cape, hood, fr. LL, cappa, capa; perhaps of Iberian origin, as Isidorus of Seville mentions it first: ``Capa, quia quasi totum capiat hominem; it. capitis ornamentum.'' See 3d {Cape}, and cf. 1st {Cope}.] 1. A covering for the head; esp. (a) One usually with a visor but without a brim, for men and boys; (b) One of lace, muslin, etc., for women, or infants; (c) One used as the mark or ensign of some rank, office, or dignity, as that of a cardinal. [1913 Webster]

2. The top, or uppermost part; the chief. [1913 Webster]

Thou art the cap of all the fools alive. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

3. A respectful uncovering of the head. [1913 Webster]

He that will give a cap and make a leg in thanks. --Fuller. [1913 Webster]

4. (Zo["o]l.) The whole top of the head of a bird from the base of the bill to the nape of the neck. [1913 Webster]

5. Anything resembling a cap in form, position, or use; as: (a) (Arch.) The uppermost of any assemblage of parts; as, the cap of column, door, etc.; a capital, coping, cornice, lintel, or plate. (b) Something covering the top or end of a thing for protection or ornament. (c) (Naut.) A collar of iron or wood used in joining spars, as the mast and the topmast, the bowsprit and the jib boom; also, a covering of tarred canvas at the end of a rope. (d) A percussion cap. See under {Percussion}. (e) (Mech.) The removable cover of a journal box. (f) (Geom.) A portion of a spherical or other convex surface. [1913 Webster]

6. A large size of writing paper; as, flat cap; foolscap; legal cap. [1913 Webster]

{Cap of a cannon}, a piece of lead laid over the vent to keep the priming dry; -- now called an apron.

{Cap in hand}, obsequiously; submissively.

{Cap of liberty}. See {Liberty cap}, under {Liberty}.

{Cap of maintenance}, a cap of state carried before the kings of England at the coronation. It is also carried before the mayors of some cities.

{Cap money}, money collected in a cap for the huntsman at the death of the fox.

{Cap paper}. (a) A kind of writing paper including flat cap, foolscap, and legal cap. (b) A coarse wrapping paper used for making caps to hold commodities.

{Cap rock} (Mining), The layer of rock next overlying ore, generally of barren vein material.

{Flat cap}, cap See {Foolscap}.

{Forage cap}, the cloth undress head covering of an officer of soldier.

{Legal cap}, a kind of folio writing paper, made for the use of lawyers, in long narrow sheets which have the fold at the top or ``narrow edge.''

{To set one's cap}, to make a fool of one. (Obs.) --Chaucer.

{To set one's cap for}, to try to win the favor of a man with a view to marriage. [Colloq.] [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • To set one's cap for — Set Set (s[e^]t), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Set}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Setting}.] [OE. setten, AS. setton; akin to OS. settian, OFries. setta, D. zetten, OHG. sezzen, G. setzen, Icel. setja, Sw. s[ a]tta, Dan. s?tte, Goth. satjan; causative from the root… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To set one's cap — Cap Cap (k[a^]p), n. [OE. cappe, AS. c[ae]ppe, cap, cape, hood, fr. LL, cappa, capa; perhaps of Iberian origin, as Isidorus of Seville mentions it first: Capa, quia quasi totum capiat hominem; it. capitis ornamentum. See 3d {Cape}, and cf. 1st… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • set one's cap for — {v. phr.}, {informal} To attempt to win the love of or to marry. * /Usually used of a girl or woman./ * /The young girl set her cap for the new town doctor, who was a bachelor./ …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • set one's cap for — {v. phr.}, {informal} To attempt to win the love of or to marry. * /Usually used of a girl or woman./ * /The young girl set her cap for the new town doctor, who was a bachelor./ …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • To set one's self against — Set Set (s[e^]t), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Set}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Setting}.] [OE. setten, AS. setton; akin to OS. settian, OFries. setta, D. zetten, OHG. sezzen, G. setzen, Icel. setja, Sw. s[ a]tta, Dan. s?tte, Goth. satjan; causative from the root… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To set one's teeth — Set Set (s[e^]t), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Set}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Setting}.] [OE. setten, AS. setton; akin to OS. settian, OFries. setta, D. zetten, OHG. sezzen, G. setzen, Icel. setja, Sw. s[ a]tta, Dan. s?tte, Goth. satjan; causative from the root… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To put one's foot down — Foot Foot (f[oo^]t), n.; pl. {Feet} (f[=e]t). [OE. fot, foot, pl. fet, feet. AS. f[=o]t, pl. f[=e]t; akin to D. voet, OHG. fuoz, G. fuss, Icel. f[=o]tr, Sw. fot, Dan. fod, Goth. f[=o]tus, L. pes, Gr. poy s, Skr. p[=a]d, Icel. fet step, pace… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To set a gin — Set Set (s[e^]t), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Set}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Setting}.] [OE. setten, AS. setton; akin to OS. settian, OFries. setta, D. zetten, OHG. sezzen, G. setzen, Icel. setja, Sw. s[ a]tta, Dan. s?tte, Goth. satjan; causative from the root… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To set a saw — Set Set (s[e^]t), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Set}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Setting}.] [OE. setten, AS. setton; akin to OS. settian, OFries. setta, D. zetten, OHG. sezzen, G. setzen, Icel. setja, Sw. s[ a]tta, Dan. s?tte, Goth. satjan; causative from the root… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To set a snare — Set Set (s[e^]t), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Set}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Setting}.] [OE. setten, AS. setton; akin to OS. settian, OFries. setta, D. zetten, OHG. sezzen, G. setzen, Icel. setja, Sw. s[ a]tta, Dan. s?tte, Goth. satjan; causative from the root… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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