To screw in
Screw Screw, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Screwed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Screwing}.] 1. To turn, as a screw; to apply a screw to; to press, fasten, or make firm, by means of a screw or screws; as, to screw a lock on a door; to screw a press. [1913 Webster]

2. To force; to squeeze; to press, as by screws. [1913 Webster]

But screw your courage to the sticking place, And we'll not fail. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

3. Hence: To practice extortion upon; to oppress by unreasonable or extortionate exactions. [1913 Webster]

Our country landlords, by unmeasurable screwing and racking their tenants, have already reduced the miserable people to a worse condition than the peasants in France. --swift. [1913 Webster]

4. To twist; to distort; as, to screw his visage. [1913 Webster]

He screwed his face into a hardened smile. --Dryden. [1913 Webster]

5. To examine rigidly, as a student; to subject to a severe examination. [Cant, American Colleges] [1913 Webster]

{To screw out}, to press out; to extort.

{To screw up}, (a) to force; to bring by violent pressure. --Howell. (b) to damage by unskillful effort; to bungle; to botch; to mess up. (c) [intrans] to fail by unskillful effort, usu. causing unpleasant consequences.

{To screw in}, to force in by turning or twisting.

{Screw around} (a) to act aimlessly or unproductively. (b) screw around with, to operate or make changes on (a machine or device) without expert knowledge; to fiddle with. (c) [Colloq.]commit adultery; to be sexually promiscuous. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • To bite in — Bite Bite (b[imac]t), v. t. [imp. {Bit} (b[i^]t); p. p. {Bitten} (b[i^]t t n), {Bit}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Biting}.] [OE. biten, AS. b[=i]tan; akin to D. bijten, OS. b[=i]tan, OHG. b[=i]zan, G. beissen, Goth. beitan, Icel. b[=i]ta, Sw. bita, Dan.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To screw out — Screw Screw, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Screwed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Screwing}.] 1. To turn, as a screw; to apply a screw to; to press, fasten, or make firm, by means of a screw or screws; as, to screw a lock on a door; to screw a press. [1913 Webster] 2 …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To screw up — Screw Screw, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Screwed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Screwing}.] 1. To turn, as a screw; to apply a screw to; to press, fasten, or make firm, by means of a screw or screws; as, to screw a lock on a door; to screw a press. [1913 Webster] 2 …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To bear in hand — Hand Hand (h[a^]nd), n. [AS. hand, hond; akin to D., G., & Sw. hand, OHG. hant, Dan. haand, Icel. h[ o]nd, Goth. handus, and perh. to Goth. hin[thorn]an to seize (in comp.). Cf. {Hunt}.] 1. That part of the fore limb below the forearm or wrist in …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To have in hand — Hand Hand (h[a^]nd), n. [AS. hand, hond; akin to D., G., & Sw. hand, OHG. hant, Dan. haand, Icel. h[ o]nd, Goth. handus, and perh. to Goth. hin[thorn]an to seize (in comp.). Cf. {Hunt}.] 1. That part of the fore limb below the forearm or wrist in …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To take in hand — Hand Hand (h[a^]nd), n. [AS. hand, hond; akin to D., G., & Sw. hand, OHG. hant, Dan. haand, Icel. h[ o]nd, Goth. handus, and perh. to Goth. hin[thorn]an to seize (in comp.). Cf. {Hunt}.] 1. That part of the fore limb below the forearm or wrist in …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Screw — Screw, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Screwed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Screwing}.] 1. To turn, as a screw; to apply a screw to; to press, fasten, or make firm, by means of a screw or screws; as, to screw a lock on a door; to screw a press. [1913 Webster] 2. To… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Screw around — Screw Screw, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Screwed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Screwing}.] 1. To turn, as a screw; to apply a screw to; to press, fasten, or make firm, by means of a screw or screws; as, to screw a lock on a door; to screw a press. [1913 Webster] 2 …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Screw theory — was developed by Sir Robert Stawell Ball in 1876, for application in kinematics and statics of mechanisms (rigid body mechanics). It is a way to express displacements, velocities, forces and torques in three dimensional space, combining both… …   Wikipedia

  • screw up one's courage — or[pluck up one s courage] {v. phr.} To force yourself to be brave. * /The small boy screwed up his courage and went upstairs in the dark./ * /When his father came home in a bad mood, it took Pete some time to screw up his courage and ask him for …   Dictionary of American idioms

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