To rub out
Rub Rub, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Rubbed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Rubbing}.] [Probably of Celtic origin; cf. W. rhwbiaw, gael. rub.] 1. To subject (a body) to the action of something moving over its surface with pressure and friction, especially to the action of something moving back and forth; as, to rub the flesh with the hand; to rub wood with sandpaper. [1913 Webster]

It shall be expedient, after that body is cleaned, to rub the body with a coarse linen cloth. --Sir T. Elyot. [1913 Webster]

2. To move over the surface of (a body) with pressure and friction; to graze; to chafe; as, the boat rubs the ground. [1913 Webster]

3. To cause (a body) to move with pressure and friction along a surface; as, to rub the hand over the body. [1913 Webster]

Two bones rubbed hard against one another. --Arbuthnot. [1913 Webster]

4. To spread a substance thinly over; to smear. [1913 Webster]

The smoothed plank, . . . New rubbed with balm. --Milton. [1913 Webster]

5. To scour; to burnish; to polish; to brighten; to cleanse; -- often with up or over; as, to rub up silver. [1913 Webster]

The whole business of our redemption is to rub over the defaced copy of the creation. --South. [1913 Webster]

6. To hinder; to cross; to thwart. [R.] [1913 Webster]

'T is the duke's pleasure, Whose disposition, all the world well knows, Will not be rubbed nor stopped. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

{To rub down}. (a) To clean by rubbing; to comb or curry; as, to down a horse. (b) To reduce or remove by rubbing; as, to rub down the rough points.

{To rub off}, to clean anything by rubbing; to separate by friction; as, to rub off rust.

{To rub out}, to remove or separate by friction; to erase; to obliterate; as, to rub out a mark or letter; to rub out a stain.

{To rub up}. (a) To burnish; to polish; to clean. (b) To excite; to awaken; to rouse to action; as, to rub up the memory. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • To dub out — Dub Dub (d[u^]b), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Dubbed} (d[u^]bd); p. pr. & vb. n. {Dubbing}.] [AS. dubban to strike, beat ( dubbade his sunu . . . to r[=i]dere. AS. Chron. an. 1086); akin to Icel. dubba; cf. OF. adouber (prob. fr. Icel.) a chevalier,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To strike out — Strike Strike, v. t. [imp. {Struck}; p. p. {Struck}, {Stricken}({Stroock}, {Strucken}, Obs.); p. pr. & vb. n. {Striking}. Struck is more commonly used in the p. p. than stricken.] [OE. striken to strike, proceed, flow, AS. str[=i]can to go,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To eat out — Eat Eat ([=e]t), v. t. [imp. {Ate} ([=a]t; 277), Obsolescent & Colloq. {Eat} ([e^]t); p. p. {Eaten} ([=e]t n), Obs. or Colloq. {Eat} ([e^]t); p. pr. & vb. n. {Eating}.] [OE. eten, AS. etan; akin to OS. etan, OFries. eta, D. eten, OHG. ezzan, G.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To chalk out — Chalk Chalk, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Chalked}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Chalking}.] 1. To rub or mark with chalk. [1913 Webster] 2. To manure with chalk, as land. Morimer. [1913 Webster] 3. To make white, as with chalk; to make pale; to bleach. Tennyson.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To rub down — Rub Rub, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Rubbed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Rubbing}.] [Probably of Celtic origin; cf. W. rhwbiaw, gael. rub.] 1. To subject (a body) to the action of something moving over its surface with pressure and friction, especially to the… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To rub off — Rub Rub, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Rubbed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Rubbing}.] [Probably of Celtic origin; cf. W. rhwbiaw, gael. rub.] 1. To subject (a body) to the action of something moving over its surface with pressure and friction, especially to the… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To rub up — Rub Rub, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Rubbed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Rubbing}.] [Probably of Celtic origin; cf. W. rhwbiaw, gael. rub.] 1. To subject (a body) to the action of something moving over its surface with pressure and friction, especially to the… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • rub out — rub (someone) out to kill someone. She got into serious trouble when she ran an ad that said, “Looking for someone to rub out your Ex?” as a joke. Usage notes: generally used when referring to criminals who employ someone to kill an enemy …   New idioms dictionary

  • rub out — verb a) To delete or erase or remove (something) by rubbing. The teacher wanted to rub out the chalk marks on the board. b) To kill. The first will understand but little of them, the latter over much; they might perhaps live and rub out in the… …   Wiktionary

  • rub out — 1) PHRASAL VERB If you rub out something that you have written on paper or a board, you remove it using a rubber or eraser. [V P n (not pron)] She began rubbing out the pencilled marks in the margin. [Also V n P] Syn: erase 2) PHRASAL VERB If one …   English dictionary

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